Commands tagged Os X (38)

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hanukkah colored bash prompt
blue and yellow colored bash prompt for a Hanukkah celebration on your box

Enter a command but keep it out of the history
Put a space in front of your command on the command line and it will not be logged as part of your command line history.

Load all files (including in subdirs), whose name matches a substring, into Vim
This command searches the current directory, and all of its subdirs, for files that have the string "foo" in their filename (foo.c, two-foo.txt, index-FOO-bar.php, etc), and opens them in Vim. It ignores any hidden .svn directories. Change -iname to -name if you want to do case-sensitive matches. Files open in buffers by default, so to verify that the correct files were opened, type ":list". You can load all the files in tabs by doing ":tab ball" or use 'vim -p' on the command-line to load files straight to tabs. If you get permission denied errors, do: vim $(find . ! -path \*.svn\* -type -f iname \*foo\* 2>/dev/null) To narrow it down to a single file extension, such as .php files, use \*foo\*.php (or '*foo*.php'. Which ever you prefer)

Query Wikipedia via console over DNS
Query Wikipedia by issuing a DNS query for a TXT record. The TXT record will also include a short URL to the complete corresponding Wikipedia entry.You can also write a little shell script like: $ $ cat wikisole.sh $ #!/bin/sh $ dig +short txt ${1}.wp.dg.cx and run it like $ ./wikisole.sh unix were your first option ($1) will be used as search term.

Kill a process by its partial name
pkill is a standard command and kills processes Byte part of their name.

Search git logs (case-insensitive)
Normally, searching git log comments is case sensitive. The -i luckily applies to the --grep switch.

pipe output to notify-send
you can put almost any command. $notify-send -t 0 "MOTD" "$(sed -n '/#^4/,/#$4/{/#^4\|#$4/!p}' motd2 | cut -d# -f2)" $notify-send -t 0 "readfile" "$(while read mess; do echo $mess;done < motd2)"

HTTP GET request on wireshark remotly

Use vi commands to edit your command lines
If you spend all day editing in vi then switching your fingers to Emacs mode just for the command line can be difficult. Use set -o vi in your bash shell and enjoy the power of a real editor.

Send a local file via email
Another way of sending an attachment. -s : subject file : file to be sent


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