Commands tagged Os X (38)

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reduce mp3 bitrate (and size, of course)
Useful if you have to put some mp3 files into mobile devices (ie mobile phones with no much memory)

Redirect incoming traffic to SSH, from a port of your choosing
Stuck behind a restrictive firewall at work, but really jonesing to putty home to your linux box for some colossal cave? Goodness knows I was...but the firewall at work blocked all outbound connections except for ports 80 and 443. (Those were wide open for outbound connections.) So now I putty over port 443 and have my linux box redirect it to port 22 (the SSH port) before it routes it internally. So, my specific command would be: $iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 443 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 22 Note that I use -A to append this command to the end of the chain. You could replace that with -I to insert it at the beginning (or at a specific rulenum). My linux box is running slackware, with a kernel from circa 2001. Hopefully the mechanics of iptables haven't changed since then. The command is untested under any other distros or less outdated kernels. Of course, the command should be easy enough to adapt to whatever service on your linux box you're trying to reach by changing the numbers (and possibly changing tcp to udp, or whatever). Between putty and psftp, however, I'm good to go for hours of time-killing.

Unlock your KDE4.3 session remotely
The unlock command for KDE 4.3 has changed from krunner_lock, this process doesn't exist anymore. So here's the update :-) If qdbus complains about not being able to find X, put a "DISPLAY=:0 " (:0 being your X server display) in front of the command.

Route outbound SMTP connections through a addtional IP address rather than your primary

find files larger than 1 GB, everywhere

Swap a file or dir with quick resotre
This lets you replace a file or directory and quickly revert if something goes wrong. For example, the current version of a website's files are in public_html. Put a new version of the site in public_html~ and execute the command. The names are swapped. If anything goes wrong, execute it again (up arrow or !!).

List your interfaces and MAC addresses
Requires sysfs mounted on /sys - may only be useful for Linux systems. Could also use "printf '%-8s %s\n' $(basename $f) $(cat $f/address)" instead of echo.

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Rename files in batch

Find the process you are looking for minus the grepped one
faster ;) but your idea is really cool


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