Commands tagged peak memory (1)

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Using vim to save and run your python script.
This will save and execute your python script every time your press the F5 function key. It can also be added to your .vimrc: autocmd BufRead *.py nmap :w^M:!python % NOTE: the ^M is not just caret-M, it can be created by type: ctrl-v ctrl-m

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Find files and calculate size of result in shell
Use find's internal stat to get the file size then let the shell add up the numbers.

Recursively move folders/files and preserve their permissions and ownership perfectly

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Query wikipedia over DNS

Display top 5 processes consuming CPU

From Vim, run current buffer in python


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