Commands tagged awk conditional (3)

  • The sample output shows each record/row with the last field zero-padded to 26 digits. For testing, I used (L)ine and field/column numbers.... Line 4, field2 = L42, etc up to the last field where I just used line numbers X 4. I had some whitespace-delimited files with variable-length records/rows (having 4 - 5 fields/columns) which required reformatting by zero-padding the last field to 26 digits. This requires setting NF (Not $NF) as an awk variable, with a simple conditional that assumes that any line where (N)umber of (F)ields does NOT equal 4 has a NF of 5. If needed, more conditional checks can be added, and the "NF" changed to any field ($1, $5, etc). Show Sample Output


    0
    awk '{var = sprintf(NF); if (var == 4) printf "%s %s %s %026d\n" , $1,$2,$3,$4; else printf "%s %s %s %s %026d\n" , $1,$2,$3,$4,$5}' yourfilegoes.here >> yournewfilegoes.here
    genatomics · 2014-12-20 02:53:35 0
  • Removes directories which are less than 1028KB total. This works for systems where blank directories are 4KB. If a directory contains 1 MB (1024KB) or less, it will remove the directory using a path relative to the directory where the command was initially executed (safer than some other options I found). Adjust the 1028 value for your needs. It would be helpful to test the results before proceeding with the removal. Simply run all but the last two commands to see a list of what will be removed: du | awk '{if($1<1028)print;}' | cut -d $'\t' -f 2- If you're unsure what size a blank folder is, test it like this: mkdir test; du test; rmdir test


    0
    du | awk '{if($1<1028)print;}' | cut -d $'\t' -f 2- | tr "\n" "\0" | xargs -0 rm -rf
    i814u2 · 2015-06-25 16:00:48 0

  • 0
    awk '{if ($3 =="LAN" && $5 == "0.00" ) print $1,  $2, "LAN",  "288",  "100.00"; else print $1 ,$2, $3, $4, $5 }' sla-avail-2013-Feb > sla-avail-2013-Feb_final
    shantanuo · 2020-02-15 10:37:44 0

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Find files that have been modified on your system in the past 60 minutes
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Add the time to BASH prompt
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In the sample output, I pressed ctrl+r and typed the letters las. I can't imagine how much typing this has saved me.


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