Commands tagged windows services (1)

  • Outputs Windows Services service name and display name using "sc query", pipes the output to "awk" for processing, then "column" for formatting. List All Services: sc query state= all | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: List Started Services: sc query | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: List Stopped Services: sc query state= inactive| awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: Show Sample Output


    1
    sc query state= all | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\:
    lowjax · 2015-02-15 22:35:10 2

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