Commands tagged telnet (10)

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grep processes list avoiding the grep itself
Trick to avoid the form: grep process | grep - v grep

create new branch from stashed changes
from http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Tools-Stashing Useful for when stash cannot be applied to current branch

List status of your git repos and let us know if there is any new files to commit.
Source: http://www.bashoneliners.com/oneliners/oneliner/225/

A function to output a man page as a pdf file
Tested on Fedora 12. This function will take a man page and convert it to pdf, saving the output to the current working directory. In Gnome, you can then view the output with "gnome-open file.pdf", or your favorite pdf viewer.

Fast tape rewind
Traditionally we rewind a tape using this syntaxis: $ mt -f /dev/rmt/0cbn rewind Redirecting the dispositive to nothing as shown above is faster. Less typing is always better.

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get all upgradable deb packages in a single line
Works for debian and ubuntu based distros.

Remove duplicate rows of an un-sorted file based on a single column
$F[0] filters using first word. $F[1] - 2nd, and so on.

Push your present working directory to a stack that you can pop later
If are a Bash user and you are in a directory and need to go else where for a while but don't want to lose where you were, use pushd instead of cd. cd /home/complicated/path/.I/dont/want/to/forget pushd /tmp cd thing/in/tmp popd (returns you to /home/complicated/path/.I/dont/want/to/forget)


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