Commands tagged logstash (1)

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Open Remote Desktop (RDP) from command line having a custom screen size
This example uses xfreerdp, which builds upon the development of rdesktop. This example usage will also send you the remote machine's sound.

Find the package that installed a command

Create subversion undo point
Allows you to save progress without committing. To revert to an undo point, svn revert then apply the undo point with patch. $ svn revert -R . && patch -p0 < .undo/2009-03-27_08:08:11rev57 Similar: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/373/archive-all-files-containing-local-changes-svn

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Command to logout all the users in one command
Logs all users out except root. I changed the grep to use a regexp in case a user's username contained the word root.

Print all lines in a file that are not a certain length
Alternatively, print all the lines that are a certain length: $awk 'length($0)==12 {print}' your_file_name

Lets Tux say the random fact. [add it to .bashrc to see it in new terminal window]

Find status of all symlinks
The symlinks command can show status of all symbolic links, including which links are dangling, which symlinks point to files on other file systems, which symlinks use ../ more than necessary, which symlinks are messy (e.g. having too many slashes or dots), etc. Other useful things it can do include removing all dangling links (-d) and converting absolute links to relative links (-c). The path given must be an absolute path (which is why I used $(pwd) in the example command).

The BOFH Excuse Server

create a new script, automatically populating the shebang line, editing the script, and making it executable.
The first argument is the interpreter for your script, the second argument is the name of the script to create.


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