Commands tagged speedtest (1)

  • Tests connection speed over HTTP request. Can use a lot of http mirrors of SAME file (Useful for test with Ubuntu mirrors, as example) and the split will be done opening connections in all urls if possible. -s Split connections in N number MAX=16 -j Set max concurrent downloads, must be equal to -s or will be restricted to this number. -x Set max connection per server, recommended to be the same of split. -k Min Split Size, default is 20MB, usefull to really force more splited connections over same file -d Directory to save the "file", in this case, /dev -o Points output to null --file-allocation=none Do not attempt to prealocate the file. --allow-overwrite=true Overwrite to /dev/null. Recommend use "rm /dev/null.aria2" after if runned as root. Show Sample Output


    0
    aria2c -s16 -j16 -x16 -k1M -d /dev -o null --file-allocation=none --allow-overwrite=true <url>
    pqatsi · 2015-06-18 13:13:12 0

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