Commands tagged awscli (6)

  • You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials Show Sample Output


    1
    head -n1 | xargs -I {} aws sts get-session-token --serial-number $MFA_ID --duration-seconds 900 --token-code {} --output text --query [Credentials.AccessKeyId,Credentials.SecretAccessKey,Credentials.SessionToken]
    keymon · 2016-04-12 10:57:00 0
  • Frustrated with the manual domain migration process AWS has, I unsuccessfully tried to install cli53, route53-transfer. I instead wrote this oneliner to ease the export (which is not supported via the AWS console ATM). The output can be easily pasted into the "Import Hosted Zone" dialog in Route53. SOA/NS records are excluded since they cannot be automatically imported. Show Sample Output


    1
    echo -e "\$ORIGIN\tumccr.org.\n\$TTL\t1h\n" && aws route53 list-resource-record-sets --hosted-zone-id Z1EEXAMPLE9SF3 | jq -r '.ResourceRecordSets[] | [.Name, .Type, .ResourceRecords[0].Value] | join("\t")' - | grep -vE "NS|SOA"
    brainstorm · 2018-06-15 01:19:21 0
  • Following in the steps of a few other scripts on here, I thought I'd mix in the ability to add in an instance tag output into this. This can be super useful if you are using the "Name" tag as a hostname tag and feeding that into, say Route53 for DNS to reach the machine. Helps for scripting against later. Show Sample Output


    0
    aws ec2 describe-instances --filters "Name=vpc-id,Values=<replace_with_id>" --query 'Reservations[].Instances[].[ [Tags[?Key==`Name`].Value][0][0],PrivateIpAddress,InstanceId,State.Name,Placement.AvailabilityZone ]' --output table
    fydgit · 2015-08-27 21:52:58 0
  • Looking up the id of a CF domain can be painful. Not anymore with this tip. Show Sample Output


    0
    aws cloudfront list-distributions | jq -r '.DistributionList | .Items | .[] | .Id + " " + .Aliases.Items[]'
    hendry · 2016-09-19 06:36:59 0
  • This allows you to get all instance profiles (roles) for a given set of tags. Lists it in CSV Show Sample Output


    0
    aws ec2 describe-instances --region us-east-1 --filters "Name=tag:YourTag,Values=YourValue" | jq '.["Reservations"]|.[]|.Instances|.[]|.IamInstanceProfile.Arn + "," +.InstanceId'
    symgryph · 2019-04-15 16:33:41 1
  • AWS provides a method to audit for obsolete AWS security groups. From their documentation: "Describes the stale security group rules for security groups in a specified VPC. Rules are stale when they reference a deleted security group in a peer VPC, or a security group in a peer VPC for which the VPC peering connection has been deleted." Show Sample Output


    0
    aws ec2 describe-vpcs --query 'Vpcs[*].VpcId' --output text |xargs -t -n1 aws ec2 describe-stale-security-groups --vpc-id
    vocatan · 2019-09-09 18:54:08 2

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