Commands tagged iptables (24)

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Convert the contents of a directory listing into a colon-separated environment variable
Useful for making a CLASSPATH out of a list of JAR files, for example. Also: export CLASSPATH=.:$(find ./lib -name '*.jar' -printf '%p:')

monitor the last command run

Open Finder from the current Terminal location
I did not know this, i'd like to share...

Parallel mysql dump restore
this command works with one gziped file per table, and restore 4 tables in parallel.

Open a file in a GTK+ dialog window
I use zenity because it's a rewrite of gdialog and also replaces gmessage and has more useful options. Using --text-info allows you to select and copy the text to your clipboard. To see a file in a list dialog: cat /etc/passwd | zenity --width 800 --height 600 --list --column Entries If you don't have zenity, you'll have to download it via apt-get install zenity, etc.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Watch the progress of 'dd'
Pressing ctrl-t will display the progress

Monitor the queries being run by MySQL
Watch is a very useful command for periodically running another command - in this using mysqladmin to display the processlist. This is useful for monitoring which queries are causing your server to clog up. More info here: http://codeinthehole.com/archives/2-Monitoring-MySQL-processes.html

Add directory to $PATH if it's not already there
Sometimes in a script you want to make sure that a directory is in the path, and add it in if it's not already there. In this example, $dir contains the new directory you want to add to the path if it's not already present. There are multiple ways to do this, but this one is a nice clean shell-internal approach. I based it on http://stackoverflow.com/a/1397020. You can also do it using tr to separate the path into lines and grep -x to look for exact matches, like this: $ if ! $(echo "$PATH" | tr ":" "\n" | grep -qx "$dir") ; then PATH=$PATH:$dir ; fi which I got from http://stackoverflow.com/a/5048977. Or replace the "echo | tr" part with a shell parameter expansion, like $ if ! $(echo "${PATH//:/$'\n'}" | grep -qx "$dir") ; then PATH=$PATH:$dir ; fi which I got from http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3209/. There are also other more regex-y ways to do it, but I find the ones listed here easiest to follow. Note some of this is specific to the bash shell.

Remove all old kernels
http://askubuntu.com/questions/89710/how-do-i-free-up-more-space-in-boot


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