Commands tagged CLFUContest (20)

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rsync over ssh via non-default ssh port
tested on cygwin and Fedora 9 . good to remember for those jobs where you cannot set a site-specific connect option in your ~/.ssh/config file.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

trace the system calls made by a process (and its children)
strace can be invaluable in trying to figure out what the heck some misbehaving program is doing. There are number of useful flags to limit and control its output, and to attach to already running programs. (See also 'ltrace'.)

aptitude easter eggs
this is a reference to Antoine de St. Exupery's "The Little Prince"

Wait for file to stop changing
This loop will finish if a file hasn't changed in the last 10 seconds. . It checks the file's modification timestamp against the clock. If 10 seconds have elapsed without any change to the file, then the loop ends. . This script will give a false positive if there's a 10 second delay between updates, e.g. due to network congestion . How does it work? 'date +%s' gives the current time in seconds 'stat -c %Y' gives the file's last modification time in seconds '$(( ))' is bash's way of doing maths '[ X -lt 10 ]' tests the result is Less Than 10 otherwise sleep for 1 second and repeat . Note: Clever as this script is, inotify is smarter.

draw honeycomb
$ tput setaf 1 && tput rev && seq -ws "___|" 81|fold -69|tr "0-9" "_" && tput sgr0 $ $ # (brick wall)

Export MS Access mdb files to csv
-H suppress Headers -I Inserts instead of csv -R to give ; as the row delimeter. Probably you can concatenate each line with a ; while importing to the db.

Find the package that installed a command

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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