Commands tagged CLFUContest (20)

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Pronounce an English word using Dictionary.com
This one uses dictionary.com

list txt files order by time
list all txt files order by time, newest first

Exclude .svn, .git and other VCS junk for a pristine tarball
~$ tar --version tar (GNU tar) 1.20

find all active IP addresses in a network
Have to run as superuser... but easier and more informational if you are looking for actual devices. Need to install arp-scan.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Dump and bz2compress a mysql db
To also move the db backup to another location you could pass the output to the dd command instead of a file $mysqldump -u user -h host -ppwd -B dbname | bzip2 -zc9 | dd ssh [email protected] "dd of=db_dump"

Get current Xorg resolution via xrandr

Copy via tar pipe while preserving file permissions (run this command as root!)
It's the same like 'cp -p' if available. It's faster over networks than scp. If you have to copy gigs of data you could also use netcat and the tar -z option in conjunction -- on the receiving end do: # nc -l 7000 | tar -xzvpf - ...and on the sending end do: # tar -czf - * | nc otherhost 7000

Advanced ls using find to show much more detail than ls ever could
This alias is super-handy for me because it quickly shows the details of each file in the current directory. The output is nice because it is sortable, allowing you to expand this basic example to do something amazing like showing you a list of the newest files, the largest files, files with bad perms, etc.. A recursive alias would be: $ alias LSR='find -mount -printf "%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G %TF_%TR %CF_%CR %AF_%AR %#15s [%Y] %p\n" 2>/dev/null' From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Skip over .svn directories when using the "find" command.
The "find" command can be annoying when used inside of a Subversion (or CVS) working directory. Obviously, you can combine this with other predicates and commands to create a more elaborate pipeline: $ find /var/svn -type f -not \( -name .svn -prune \) -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum Note: You can use my "dont-go-there.sh" script to wrap the "find" command and do this automatically at http://forwardlateral.com/blog/2006/02/27/dont-go-there/


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