Commands tagged exit (6)

  • this exits bash without saving the history. unlike explicitly disabling the history in some way, this works anywhere, and it works if you decide *after* issuing the command you don't want logged, that you don't want it logged ... $$ ( or ${$} ) is the pid of the current bash instance this also works perfectly in shells that don't have $$ if you do something like kill -9 `readlink /proc/self`


    29
    kill -9 $$
    stu · 2009-03-27 23:13:53 12
  • Put this in your ~/.bashrc file (or the equivalent) If you use vim a lot, this alias will be immediately obvious. Your brain will thank you.


    9
    alias ':q'='exit'
    tobiasboon · 2009-09-05 17:59:50 2
  • For those who like to hit instead of typing "exit" to leave the shell and find it annoying that it doesn't work in Midnight Commander, just press to switch to the subshell and now you can leave with


    1
    <ctrl+o><ctrl+d>
    adeverteuil · 2015-08-19 20:57:09 4

  • 0
    <F10><return>
    quesne · 2015-08-20 10:48:21 0
  • Use meaningful exit codes change "source" to "cat" to view output instead of assigning Show Sample Output


    -1
    source <(egrep '^#define EX_.*' /usr/include/sysexits.h | sed -e 's/#define/declare -r/g' | sed 's/\//#/g' | sed -e 's/\s\{1,\}/ /g' | sed -e 's/ \([0-9]\)/\=\1/'g )
    fishdaemon · 2012-09-21 13:30:37 0
  • this command will add the following two lines into the ~/.bash_aliases: alias exit='pwd > ~/.lastdir;exit' [ -n "$(cat .lastdir 2>/dev/null)" ] && cd "$(cat .lastdir)" or redirect it to the ~/.bashrc if you like Donno, I find it usefull. You may also define an alias for 'cd ~' like - alias cdh='cd ~'


    -1
    echo -e 'alias exit='\''pwd > ~/.lastdir;exit'\''\n[ -n "$(cat .lastdir 2>/dev/null)" ] && cd "$(cat .lastdir)"' >> ~/.bash_aliases
    ichbins · 2014-01-28 18:02:04 0

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