Commands tagged /proc (2)

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cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh [email protected] "cat - >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys"
You'll want to use this for passwordless logins. Same as ssh-copy-id, if you don't have it on your system.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find out when your billion-second anniversary is (was). (on OS X)
This is the same command as this one, but for OS X. http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3053/find-out-when-your-billion-second-anniversary-is-was.

Send a signed and encrypted email from the command line
A very simple command to send a signed and encrypted message from the command line using GPG Keys

restart apache only if config works
making lots of configurations to apache and restarting the server only to find it broken just plain sucks.

ROT13 whole file in vim.
gg puts the cursor at the begin g? ROT13 until the next mov G the EOF

Take a screenshot of a login screen
when using Gnome or KDE, you will have a hard time getting a screenshot of something like a login screen, or any other screen that occurs before the desktop environment is up and monitoring the printscreen key. (this probably applies for other DEs as well, but I haven't used them) What this command is meant to do is take a screenshot of an X window using a command you can run from your virtual terminals (actual text terminals, not just an emulator) To do this: Press CTRL+ALT+F1 to go to a virtual (text) terminal once your login window comes up Login to the virtual terminal and enter the command (you'll have to type it in) You should now have a file called screenshot.png in your home directory with your screenshot in it. For those of you who are new to the virtual terminal thing, you can use CTRL+ALT+F7 to get back to your regular GUI From http://www.gnome.org

Split a large file, without wasting disk space
It's common to want to split up large files and the usual method is to use split(1). If you have a 10GiB file, you'll need 10GiB of free space. Then the OS has to read 10GiB and write 10GiB (usually on the same filesystem). This takes AGES. . The command uses a set of loop block devices to create fake chunks, but without making any changes to the file. This means the file splitting is nearly instantaneous. The example creates a 1GiB file, then splits it into 16 x 64MiB chunks (/dev/loop0 .. loop15). . Note: This isn't a drop-in replacement for using split. The results are block devices. tar and zip won't do what you expect when given block devices. . These commands will work: $ hexdump /dev/loop4 . $ gzip -9 < /dev/loop6 > part6.gz . $ cat /dev/loop10 > /media/usb/part10.bin

ruby one-liner to get the current week number

Run local bash script on remote server
Run local scripts on remote server. "-T Disable pseudo-tty allocation"


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