Commands tagged ascii (30)

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Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

bash alias for sdiff: differ
this is just okey

Break lines after, for example 78 characters, but don't break within a word/string
Per default, linux/unix shells are configured with a width of 80 characters. If you like to edit a phrase or string on a line with more than 80 characters it might take long to go there (for example a line with 1000 characters and you like to edit the 98th word which is character 598-603). Maybe you might wish to use 78 characters, because if you forward the text via mail and the text will be quoted (2 extra characters at the beginning to the line "> "), you use 80 characters, otherwise 82, which are lame.

Files extension change
Changing a file extension to a new one for all files in a directory.

uniq without pre-sorting
Reads stdin, and outputs each line only once - without sorting ahead of time. This does use more memory than your system's sort utility.

Batch Convert SVG to PNG
Convert some SVG files into PNG using ImageMagick's convert command.

Makes you look busy
This makes an alias for a command named 'busy'. The 'busy' command opens a random file in /usr/include to a random line with vim. Drop this in your .bash_aliases and make sure that file is initialized in your .bashrc.

netstat with group by (ip adress)
Same as the rest, but handle IPv6 short IPs. Also, sort in the order that you're probably looking for.

see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network
see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network

Watch command
Repeat command after every 2 secs


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