Commands tagged info (9)

  • Some commands have more information on 'info' than in the man pages


    9
    rtfm() { help $@ || info $@ || man $@ || $BROWSER "http://www.google.com/search?q=$@"; }
    seattlegaucho · 2011-01-05 21:26:51 1
  • Info has some of the worst keybindings I've ever seen. Being a vim user, I attribute that to emacs influence. Use the --vi-keys option to use some of the vi keybindings, although this won't change all the keybindings. Use the "infokey" program to have more control over info keybindings.


    8
    info --vi-keys
    kFiddle · 2009-04-11 22:10:08 4
  • This makes GNU info output menu items recursively and pipe its contents to less, allowing one to use GNU info in a manner similar to 'man'.


    4
    info --subnodes -o - <item> | less
    EvanTeitelman · 2013-06-11 01:23:23 0
  • I use this alias in my bashrc. The --vi-keys option makes info use vi-like and less-like key bindings.


    3
    alias info='info --vi-keys'
    eightmillion · 2010-02-16 16:35:17 0
  • I put this command on my ~/.bashrc in order to learn something new about installed packages on my Debian/Ubuntu system each time I open a new terminal Show Sample Output


    2
    dpkg-query --status $(dpkg --get-selections | awk '{print NR,$1}' | grep -oP "^$( echo $[ ( ${RANDOM} % $(dpkg --get-selections| wc -l) + 1 ) ] ) \K.*")
    acavagni · 2019-06-01 13:24:07 0
  • Nice interface for an info page.


    1
    yelp info:foo
    renich · 2009-03-29 07:14:48 2
  • I like man pages, and I like using `less(1)` as my pager. However, most GNU software keeps the manual in the 'GNU Texinfo' format, and I'm not a fan of the info(1) interface. Just give me less. This command will print out the info(1) pages, using the familiar interface of less! Show Sample Output


    1
    info gpg |less
    StefanLasiewski · 2010-07-01 23:44:15 2
  • Find installed network devices. Show Sample Output


    1
    sudo lshw -C network
    cantormath · 2012-06-07 10:32:49 0
  • This command is similar to the above, but is much simpler to remember. Sure, it's isn't as precise as the parent command, but most people aren't going to remember those --flags anyways unless you stick it into your .bashrc on every single system that you manage. Show Sample Output


    0
    info foo |less
    StefanLasiewski · 2013-09-12 16:49:08 0

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

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swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
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