Commands tagged gitlab (1)

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An alarm clock using xmms2 and at
I like the order of the arguments better this way.

find the biggest file in current folder

convert single digit to double digits
Uses 'rename' to pad zeros in front of first existing number in each filename. The "--" is not required, but it will prevent errors on filenames which start with "-". You can change the "2d" to any number you want, equaling the total numeric output: aka, 4d = ????, 8d = ????????, etc. I setup a handful of handy functions to this effect (because I couldn't figure out how to insert a var for the value) in the form of 'padnum?', such as: padnum5 () { /usr/bin/rename 's/\d+/sprintf("%05d",$&)/e' -- $@ } Which would change a file "foo-1.txt" to "foo-00001.txt"

Display error pages in report format
This command will return a full list of Error 404 pages in the given access log. The following variables have been given to awk Hostname ($2), ERROR Code ($9), Missing Item ($7), Referrer ($11) You can then send this into a file (>> /path/to/file), which you can open with OpenOffice as a CSV

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Send command to all terminals in a screen session

extract column from csv file
extracts the 5th column using the delimiter ','

Extract rpm package name, version and release using some fancy sed regex
This command could seem pretty pointless especially when you can get the same result more easily using the rpm builtin queryformat, like: $ rpm -qa --qf "%{NAME} %{VERSION} %{RELEASE}.%{ARCH}\n" | sort | column -t but nonetheless I've learned that sometimes it can be quite interesting trying to explore alternative ways to accomplish the same task (as Perl folks like to say: There's more than one way to do it!)

throttle bandwidth with cstream
this bzips a folder and transfers it over the network to "host" at 777k bit/s. cstream can do a lot more, have a look http://www.cons.org/cracauer/cstream.html#usage for example: $ echo w00t, i'm 733+ | cstream -b1 -t2 hehe :)

Find the package that installed a command


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