Commands tagged Versioning (2)

  • Apart from an exact copy of your recent contents, also keep all earlier versions of files and folders that were modified or deleted. Inspired by the excellent EVACopy http://evacopy.sourceforge.net Show Sample Output


    5
    backup() { source=$1 ; rsync --relative --force --ignore-errors --no-perms --chmod=ugo=rwX --delete --backup --backup-dir=$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M%S)_Backup --whole-file -a -v $source/ ~/Backup ; } ; backup /source_folder_to_backup
    pascalv · 2018-08-02 21:27:29 0

  • 0
    & 'C:\cwRsync_5.5.0_x86_Free\bin\rsync.exe' --force --ignore-errors --no-perms --chmod=ugo=rwX --checksum --delete --backup --backup-dir="_EVAC/$(Get-Date -Format "yyyy-MM-dd-HH-mm-ss")" --whole-file -a -v "//MyServer/MyFolder" "/cygdrive/c/Backup"
    pascalv · 2020-03-06 10:17:42 14

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