Commands tagged urlencode (1)

  • opposite of https://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10014/urldecoding-with-one-pure-bash-builtin ;-) Show Sample Output


    2
    function URLEncode { local dataLength="${#1}"; local index; for ((index = 0;index < dataLength;index++)); do local char="${1:index:1}"; case $char in [a-zA-Z0-9.~_-]) printf "$char"; ;; *) printf "%%%02X" "'$char"; ;; esac; done; }
    emphazer · 2018-09-14 12:08:10 3

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