Commands tagged nmcli (1)

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Reduce PDF Filesize

synchronicity
The British Government entering in the Gregorian era.

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

invoke MATLAB functions from command line
`-r script.m` also possible

Open screen on the previous command
I often find myself wanting to open screen on whatever command I'm currently running. Unfortunately, opening a fresh screen session spawns a new bash session, which doesn't keep my history, so calling screen directly with the previous command is the only way to go.

Send a binary file as an attachment to an email
The uuencode utility will encode your file so that it can be sent as an attachment to an email. It is part of the sharutils package in RHEL/CentOS/Fedora.

list files recursively by size

monitor the last command run

Print permanent subtitles on a video
It prints myvideo.srt subtitle files in myvideo.avi, saving it in myvideo_subtitled.avi

Add line number count as C-style comments
I often find the need to number enumerations and other lists when programming. With this command, create a new file called 'inputfile' with the text you want to number. Paste the contents of 'outputfile' back into your source file and fix the tabbing if necessary. You can also change this to output hex numbering by changing the "%02d" to "%02x". If you need to start at 0 replace "NR" with "NR-1". I adapted this from http://osxdaily.com/2010/05/20/easily-add-line-numbers-to-a-text-file/.


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