Commands tagged BouncyCastle (3)

  • This command imports the certificate file cert.pfx into the keystore file, using BouncyCastle as security provider. It was validated using - OpenJDK Runtime Environment (Zulu 8.36.0.1-CA-linux64) - Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_192-ea-b04) - OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 9.0.4+11) - OpenJDK Runtime Environment 18.9 (build 11.0.2+9) Show Sample Output


    -1
    keytool -importcert -providerpath bcprov-jdk15on-1.60.jar -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider -storetype BCPKCS12 -trustcacerts -alias <alias> -file <filename.cer> -keystore <filename>
    andresaquino · 2019-02-25 08:39:05 0
  • This command imports the keystore file cert.pfx into the keystore file, using BouncyCastle as security provider. It was validated using - OpenJDK Runtime Environment (Zulu 8.36.0.1-CA-linux64) - Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_192-ea-b04) - OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 9.0.4+11) - OpenJDK Runtime Environment 18.9 (build 11.0.2+9) Show Sample Output


    -1
    keytool -importkeystore -providerpath bcprov.jar -provider BouncyCastleProvider -srckeystore <filename.pfx> -srcstoretype pkcs12 -srcalias <src-alias> -destkeystore <filename.ks> -deststoretype BCPKCS12 -destalias <dest-alias>
    andresaquino · 2019-02-25 08:40:18 0
  • This command lists the fingerprints of all of the certificates in the keystore, using BouncyCastle as security provider. Show Sample Output


    -2
    keytool -list -providerpath bcprov-jdk15on-1.60.jar -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider -storetype BCPKCS12 -storepass <passphrase> -keystore <filename>
    andresaquino · 2019-02-25 08:44:32 0

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