Commands tagged grep ascii (1)

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revert a committed change in SVN
This command can be used to revert a particular changeset in the local copy. I find this useful because I frequently import files into the wrong directory. After the import it says "Committed revision 123" or similar. to revert this change in the working copy do: svn merge -c -123 . (don't forget the .) and then commit.

get a random command
This command will show an random command. this is useful if you want to explore various random commands.

OpenDns IP update via curl
Your IP is resolved by OpenDns Server (like a caller ID telephone, every server knows who is calling ;-) Change user:password by yours Be Happy

Copy a file to a new directory created on the fly
You need to cp, mv, scp, ..., some files around from one place to another, and after having laboriously typed out the source path, you remember that the destination directory doesn't yet exist, and so the command will fail. So rather than killing the command line and starting over, just interpolate the results of creating the directory and echo its name. You could DRY this with a for; do; done, but that may be more trouble than it's worth.

Count all files in directories recursively with find
Counts the files present in the different directories recursively. One only has to change maxdepth to have further insight in the directory hierarchy. Found at unix.stackexchange.com: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/4105/how-do-i-count-all-the-files-recursively-through-directories

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript (for Windows)
#4345 also works under windows

Create commands to download all of your Picasaweb albums
Create commands to download all of your Picasaweb albums Install Googlecl (http://code.google.com/p/googlecl/) and authenticate first.

recursively change file name from uppercase to lowercase (or viceversa)
Example of zsh globing, glob qualifier, and substitution: -Q state that the parameter will contain a glob qualifier. (**/)(*) is recursive (.) is our glob qualifier, with states the match is a file "." The first parameter $1, is then substituted with $2 but with lowercasing '(L)' ... a (U) would of course be from lower to upper.

watch iptables counters
This will allow you to watch as matches occur in real-time. To filter out only ACCEPT, DROP, LOG..etc, then run the following command: watch 'iptables -nvL | grep -v "0 0" && grep "ACCEPT"' The -v is used to do an inverted filter. ie. NOT "0 0"

Remote backups with tar over ssh
Execute it from the source host, where the source files you wish backup resides. With the minus '-' the tar command deliver the compressed output to the standar output and, trough over the ssh session to the remote host. On the other hand the backup host will be receive the stream and read it from the standar input sending it to the /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2


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