Commands tagged extract package name (1)

  • This command could seem pretty pointless especially when you can get the same result more easily using the rpm builtin queryformat, like: rpm -qa --qf "%{NAME} %{VERSION} %{RELEASE}.%{ARCH}\n" | sort | column -t but nonetheless I've learned that sometimes it can be quite interesting trying to explore alternative ways to accomplish the same task (as Perl folks like to say: There's more than one way to do it!) Show Sample Output


    3
    rpm -qa | sed 's/^\(.*\)-\([^-]\{1,\}\)-\([^-]\{1,\}\)$/\1 \2 \3/' | sort | column -t
    acavagni · 2019-03-14 21:11:45 0

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