Commands tagged ssh (186)

  • Set Remote Server Date using Local Server Time (push) Show Sample Output


    5
    ssh user@server sudo date -s @`( date -u +"%s" )`
    daryltucker · 2015-03-26 20:25:23 2
  • I find it ugly & sexy at the same time isn't it ?


    4
    [[ $(COLUMNS=200 ps faux | awk '/grep/ {next} /ssh -N -R 4444/ {i++} END {print i}') ]] || nohup ssh -N -R 4444:localhost:22 user@relay &
    j0rn · 2009-03-31 09:39:59 3
  • This starts a very basic X session, with just a simple xterm. You can use this xterm to launch your preferred distant session. ssh -X john@otherbox gnome-session Try also startkde or fluxbox or xfce4-session. To switch between your two X servers, use CTRL+ALT+F7 and CTRL+ALT+F8.


    4
    xinit -- :1
    flux · 2009-07-31 23:42:28 1
  • middlehost allows ssh access from where you are but not securehost. Use nice ssh piping to simulate scp through A => B => C setting up the shell function if left as an exercise for the reader. ;-) Agent forwarding should avoid password typing.


    4
    cat nicescript |ssh middlehost "cat | ssh -a root@securehost 'cat > nicescript'"
    syladmin · 2009-08-25 08:11:12 1
  • dsh - Distributed shell, or dancer?s shell ;-) you can put your servers into /etc/dsh/machines.list than you don't have to serperate them by commata or group them in different files and only run commands for this groups dsh -M -c -a -- "apt-get update" Show Sample Output


    4
    dsh -M -c -f servers -- "command HERE"
    foob4r · 2009-08-31 12:08:38 0
  • Get your server's fingerprints to give to users to verify when they ssh in. Publickey locations may vary by distro. Fingerprints should be provided out-of-band. Show Sample Output


    4
    ssh-keygen -l -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key.pub && ssh-keygen -l -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_dsa_key.pub
    Mikelifeguard · 2009-10-26 17:52:41 0

  • 4
    startx -- /usr/X11R6/bin/Xnest :5 -geometry 800x600
    ivanatora · 2010-02-26 11:02:27 2
  • Useful to create an alias that sends you right in the directory you want : alias server-etc="ssh -t server 'cd /etc && $SHELL'"


    4
    ssh -t server 'cd /etc && $SHELL'
    dooblem · 2010-04-02 19:34:09 0
  • - port 8080 on localhost will be a SOCKSv5 proxy - at localhost:localport1 you will be connected to the external source server1:remoteport1 and at bind_address2:localport2 to server2:remoteport2 - you will be using only IPv4 and arcfour/blowfish-cbc, in order to speed up the tunnel - if you lose the connection, autossh will resume it at soon as possible - the tunnel is here a background process, wiithout any terminal window open


    4
    autossh -M 0 -p 22 -C4c arcfour,blowfish-cbc -NfD 8080 -2 -L localport1:server1:remoteport1 -L bind_address2:localport2:server2:remoteport2 user@sshserver
    dddddsadasdasd · 2010-11-13 23:49:09 0
  • This one is a bit more robust -- the remote machine may not have an .ssh directory, and it may not have an authorized_keys file, but if it does already, and you want to replace your ssh public key for some reason, this will work in that case as well, without duplicating the entry.


    4
    cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh <REMOTE> "(cat > tmp.pubkey ; mkdir -p .ssh ; touch .ssh/authorized_keys ; sed -i.bak -e '/$(awk '{print $NF}' ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub)/d' .ssh/authorized_keys; cat tmp.pubkey >> .ssh/authorized_keys; rm tmp.pubkey)"
    tamouse · 2011-09-30 07:39:24 2
  • You need to install "sshpass" for this to work. apt-get install sshpass


    4
    sshpass -p "YOUR_PASSWORD" ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no YOUR_USERNAME@SOME_SITE.COM
    o0110o · 2013-05-24 14:33:38 3
  • Place in ~/.bashrc If you login to a ssh server from different ips, sometimes you want to do something specific for each. e.g., quickly go into screen -x session from a phone, but not your desktop.


    4
    if [ "${SSH_CLIENT%% *}" == "ipaddr" ]; then command; fi
    snipertyler · 2015-01-13 22:09:38 2
  • The ssh command alone will execute the sudo command remotely, but the password will be visible in the terminal as you type it. The two stty commands disable the terminal from echoing the password back to you, which makes the remote sudo act as it does locally.


    3
    stty -echo; ssh -t HOSTNAME "sudo some_command"; stty echo
    jmcantrell · 2009-03-04 19:44:36 3
  • I used this to confirm an upgrade to an SSH daemon was successful Show Sample Output


    3
    ssh -vN hostname 2>&1 | grep "remote software version"
    sud0er · 2009-03-31 18:28:41 1
  • Redirects the contents of your clipboard through a pipe, to a remote machine via SSH.


    3
    pbpaste | ssh user@hostname 'cat > ~/my_new_file.txt'
    mikedamage · 2009-07-14 16:32:03 0

  • 3
    mkfifo /tmp/fifo; ssh-keygen; ssh-copyid root@remotehostaddress; sudo ssh root@remotehost "tshark -i eth1 -f 'not tcp port 22' -w -" > /tmp/fifo &; sudo wireshark -k -i /tmp/fifo;
    Code_Bleu · 2010-01-05 14:40:06 0
  • You set the file/dirname transfer variable, in the end point you set the path destination, this command uses pipe view to show progress, compress the file outut and takes account to change the ssh cipher. Support dirnames with spaces. Merged ideas and comments by http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/4379/copy-working-directory-and-compress-it-on-the-fly-while-showing-progress and http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3177/move-a-lot-of-files-over-ssh Show Sample Output


    3
    file='path to file'; tar -cf - "$file" | pv -s $(du -sb "$file" | awk '{print $1}') | gzip -c | ssh -c blowfish user@host tar -zxf - -C /opt/games
    starchox · 2010-01-19 16:02:45 0
  • You may go to Internet by means of your home ssh server. You must configure your local proxy to send traffic through the proxy. Many programs allows that: firefox, pidgin, skype, gnome, etc. Your home ssh server must listen in any of the ports permitted by your enterprise firewall. That usually includes 80 and 443. Show Sample Output


    3
    autossh -N -D localhost:1080 myhome.example.net -p 443
    prayer · 2010-05-22 19:52:30 0
  • Do the same as pssh, just in shell syntax. Put your hosts in hostlist, one per line. Command outputs are gathered in output and error directories.


    3
    xargs -n1 -P100 -I{} sh -c 'ssh {} uptime >output/{} 2>error/{}' <hostlist
    dooblem · 2010-08-20 11:03:11 0
  • This version transfers gzipped data which is unzipped as it arrives at the remote host.


    3
    ssh user@host 'gunzip - > file' < file.gz
    putnamhill · 2010-09-20 14:04:47 0
  • When debugging an ssh connection either to optimize your settings ie compression, ciphers, or more commonly for debugging an issue connecting, this alias comes in real handy as it's not easy to remember the '-o LogLevel=DEBUG3' argument, which adds a boost of debugging info not available with -vvv alone. Especially useful are the FD info, and the setup negotiation to create a cleaner, faster connection. Show Sample Output


    3
    alias sshv='ssh -vvv -o LogLevel=DEBUG3'
    AskApache · 2010-10-30 11:23:52 0
  • commandline for mac os x


    3
    ssh user@server.com sudo tcpdump -i eth0 -w - 'port 80'| /Applications/Wireshark.app/Contents/Resources/bin/wireshark -k -i -
    bkendinibilir · 2012-01-23 18:16:22 0
  • Example: remote install an application(wine). sshpass -p 'mypssword' ssh -t mysshloginname@192.168.1.22 "echo 'mypassword' | sudo -S apt-get install wine" Tested on Ubuntu.


    3
    sshpass -p 'sshpssword' ssh -t <sshuser>@<remotehost> "echo <sudopassword> | sudo -S <command>"
    dynaguy · 2012-09-13 20:27:13 5
  • A wrapper around ssh to automatically provide logging and session handling. This function runs ssh, which runs screen, which runs script. . The logs and the screen session are stored on the server. This means you can leave a session running and re-attach to it later, or from another machine. . . Requirements: * Log sessions on a remote server * Transparent - nothing extra to type * No installation - nothing to copy to the server beforehand . Features: * Function wrapper delegating to ssh - so nothing to remember - uses .ssh/config as expected - passes your command line option to ssh * Self-contained: no scripts to install on the server * Uses screen(1), so is: - detachable - re-attachable - shareable * Records session using script(1) * Configurable log file location, which may contain variables or whitespace L="$HOME" # local variable L="\$HOME" # server variable L="some space" . Limitations: * Log dir/file may not contain '~' (which would require eval on the server) . . The sessions are named by the local user connecting to the server. Therefore if you detach and re-run the same command you will reconnect to your original session. If you want to connect/share another's session simply run: USER=bob ssh root@server . The command above is stripped down to an absolute minimum. A fully expanded and annotated version is available as a Gist (git pastebin): https://gist.github.com/flatcap/3c42326abeb1197ee714 . If you want to add timing info to script, change the command to: ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script --timing=\"$L-timing\" -f \"$L\"";} Show Sample Output


    3
    ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script -f \"$L\"";}
    flatcap · 2015-10-14 13:14:29 1

  • 2
    ssh -NL 2000:remotehost:22 remotehost
    prayer · 2009-03-10 15:09:54 2
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