Commands tagged ssh (188)

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A command line calculator in Perl
Once I wrote a command line calculator program in C, then I found this... and added to it a bit. For ease of use I normally use this in a tiny Perl program (which I call pc for 'Perl Calculator') #!/usr/bin/perl -w die "Usage: $0 MATHS\n" unless(@ARGV);for(@ARGV){s/x/*/g;s/v/sqrt /g;s/\^/**/g}; print eval(join('',@ARGV)),$/; It handles square roots, power, modulus: $ pc 1+2 (1 plus 2) 3 $ pc 3x4 (3 times 4) 12 $ pc 5^6 (5 to the power of 6) 15625 $ pc v 49 ( square root of 49 ) 7 $ pc 12/3 (12 divided by 3) 4 $ pc 19%4 (19 modulus 4) 3 (you can string maths together too) $ pc 10 x 10 x 10 1000 $ pc 10 + 10 + 10 / 2 25 $ pc 7 x v49 49

Convert tab separate file (TSV) to JSON with jq
With this command you can convert a tab separate file (TSV) into a JSON file with jq. For example, this input.tsv i-0b9adca882e5e6326 172.16.0.188 i-088dd69e5c3624888 172.16.0.102 i-0e70eac180537d4aa 172.16.0.85 will produce the showed output.

cp the file
Copy the file with the given .extension at the source file's location. Eliminates the typing of long paths again and again.

Remove all .svn folders
-depth argument will cause find to do a "depth first" tree search, this will eliminate the "No such file or directory" error messages

Get HTTP status code with curl AND print response on new line

sort list of email addresses by domain.tld
email random list can be created here: https://www.randomlists.com/email-addresses

(Git) Revert files with changed mode, not content
I sometimes (due to mismanagement!) end up with files in a git repo which have had their modes changed, but not their content. This one-liner lets me revert the mode changes, while leaving changed-content files be, so I can commit just the actual changes made.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

commentate specified line of a file
used when modify several configuration files with a single command

truncate deleted files from lsof
While the posted solution works, I'm a bit uneasy about the "%d" part. This would be hyper-correct approach: $ lsof|gawk '$4~/txt/{next};/REG.*\(deleted\)$/{sub(/.$/,"",$4);printf ">/proc/%s/fd/%s\n", $2,$4}' Oh, and you gotta pipe the result to sh if you want it to actually trim the files. ;) Btw, this approach also removes false negatives (OP's command skips any deleted files with "txt" in their name).


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