Commands tagged beep (13)

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Resolve the "all display buffers are busy, please try later" error on a Foundry

Create directory named after current date
Not a discovery but a useful one nontheless. In the above example date format is 'yyyymmdd'. For other possible formats see 'man date'. This command can be also very convenient when aliased to some meaningful name: $ alias mkdd='mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)'

create directory and set owner/group/mode in one shot

locate a filename, make sure it exists and display it with full details
use the locate command to find files on the system and verify they exist (-e) then display each one in full details.

Remove old kernel packages

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Replace underscores with spaces in filenames and dirnames, recursively into subdirs.
Everyone wants to take spaces out of filenames. Forget that. I want to put them back in. We've got tools and filesystems that support spaces, they look better, so I'm going to use them. Because of how find works I find I need to run this multiple times, if it's renaming subdirs. But it can be re-run without issues. I got this version of the command from a comment in this underscore-generating command. http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/760/find-recursively-from-current-directory-down-files-and-directories-whose-names-contain-single-or-multiple-whitespaces-and-replace-each-such-occurrence-with-a-single-underscore. All I did was change the regex.

Do one ping to a URL, I use this in a MRTG gauge graph to monitor connectivity

Top 10 Memory Processes
It displays the top 10 processes sorted by memory usage

a find and replace within text-based files
using find's exec option instead of a for loop and using sed's -i option for inplace replacement. no need to do the file swap.


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