Commands tagged loop (35)

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create an incremental backup of a directory using hard links
dname is a directory named something like 20090803 for Aug 3, 2009. lastbackup is a soft link to the last backup made - say 20090802. $folder is the folder being backed up. Because this uses hard linking, files that already exist and haven't changed take up almost no space yet each date directory has a kind of "snapshot" of that day's files. Naturally, lastbackup needs to be updated after this operation. I must say that I can't take credit for this gem; I picked it up from somewhere on the net so long ago I don't remember where from anymore. Ah, well... Systems that are only somewhat slicker than this costs hundreds or even thousands of dollars - but we're HACKERS! We don't need no steenkin' commercial software... :)

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Remove all the files except abc in the directory
Finds all files in the current directory and deletes them besides file called "abc"

Watch for when your web server returns
If your web server is down, this command will periodically attempt to connect to it. If the output is blank, your server is not yet up. If you see HTML, your server is up. Obviously, you need to replace the Google URL with your web server URL... * 'watch' -- a command for re-executing a command and displaying the output * '-n 15' -- tells watch to redo the command every 15 seconds * 'curl' -- a handy utility for getting the source of a web page * '-s' -- tells curl to be silent about failing * '--connect-timeout 10' -- Try to connect for 10 seconds

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Restrict the use of dmesg for current user/session
Linux offers an interesting option to restrict the use of dmesg. It is available via /proc/sys/kernel/dmesg_restrict. You can check the status with: $ cat /proc/sys/kernel/dmesg_restrict Alternatively you can use sysctl: $ sudo sysctl -w kernel.dmesg_restrict=1 To make your change persistent across reboot, edit a fille in /etc/sysctl.d/.

Disable graphical login on Solaris
With a full installation of Solaris 10, the graphical login and desktop will start by default. This command will disable that feature. To enable it again use: /usr/dt/bin/dtconfig -e

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

check the status of 'dd' in progress (OS X)
"killall -USR1 dd" does not work in OS X for me. However, sending INFO instead of USR1 works.


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