Commands tagged stdout (10)


  • 58
    strace -ff -e trace=write -e write=1,2 -p SOME_PID
    oernii2 · 2010-04-20 08:55:54 2
  • similar to the previous command, but with more friendly output (tested on linux)


    10
    strace -ff -e write=1,2 -s 1024 -p PID 2>&1 | grep "^ |" | cut -c11-60 | sed -e 's/ //g' | xxd -r -p
    systemj · 2010-04-23 16:22:17 0
  • You have a script where =ALL= STDERR should be redirected to STDIN and you don't want to add "2>&1" at the end of each command... E.G.: ls -al /foo/bar 2>&1 Than just add this piece of code at the beginning of your script! I hope this can help someone. :)


    9
    exec 2>&1
    morgents · 2010-08-05 08:24:18 0
  • Useful to recover a output(stdout and stderr) "disown"ed or "nohup"ep process of other instance of ssh. With the others options the stdout / stderr is intercepted, but only the first n chars. This way we can recover ALL text of stdout or stderr Show Sample Output


    3
    strace -e write=1,2 -p $PID 2>&1 | sed -un "/^ |/p" | sed -ue "s/^.\{9\}\(.\{50\}\).\+/\1/g" -e 's/ //g' | xxd -r -p
    glaudiston · 2010-10-06 19:37:39 1
  • I've had a horrible time trying to pipe the output of some shell built-ins like 'time' to other programs. The built-in doesn't output to stdout or stderr most of the time but using the above will let you pipe the output to something else. Show Sample Output


    1
    TIME=$( { time YOUR_COMMAND_HERE; } 2>&1 ) ; echo $TIME
    allrightname · 2010-11-18 15:48:05 0
  • save as shell script and pipe your command output Show Sample Output


    0
    #!/bin/zsh SHL='\\e[0;31m' EHL='\\e[0m' while read line; do TEXT=$line for SSTR in $*; do TEXT=$(echo $TEXT | sed -e "s:$SSTR:${SHL}${SSTR}${EHL}:g") done echo -e $TEXT done
    steigr · 2012-06-06 12:57:50 0
  • This will be very helpful when you are debugging shell scripts, where you don?t want to display the echo statement and interested in only looking at the error messages. Similarly use 2> to supress error messages Show Sample Output


    0
    cat file.txt > /dev/null
    ankush108 · 2012-06-26 18:34:12 0
  • Very convenient to for sending data to the clipboard for processing. However, note that tee will affect the buffering of the output (stdout won't be update very live). Show Sample Output


    0
    alias t="tee >(pbcopy)"
    lgarron · 2014-01-24 12:41:07 0
  • Run a job in the background and prefix it's output with some string. This is particularly useful if you are running inside a docker container in a startup script (sue me, I'll run two jobs in a docker container if I want to) and you can run something like: /usr/sbin/nginx 2>&1 | awk '{print "[NGINX] " $0}' & /opt/jws-3.1/tomcat8/bin/catalina.sh run 2>&1 | awk '{print "[TOMCAT] " $0}' & while true; do ; done it can also be combined with tee to create a file log as well as a stdout log, for example if the script above where a script called "/bin/start-container.sh" then you could run /bin/start-container.sh | tee /var/log/containerlogs Show Sample Output


    0
    nginx 2>&1 | awk '{print "[NGINX] " $0}' &
    hvindin · 2017-04-25 22:18:38 0
  • Adds the stdout (standard output) to the beginning of logfile.txt. Change "command" to whatever command you like, such as 'ls' or 'date', etc. It does this by adding the output to a temporary file, then adding the previous contents of logfile.txt to the temp file, then copying the new contents back to the logfile.txt and removing the temp file.


    -2
    command > tmp && cat logfile.txt >> tmp && tmp > logfile.txt && rm tmp
    akoumjian · 2009-04-05 22:00:32 7

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

find all files containing a pattern, open them using vi and place cursor to the first match, use 'n' and ':n' to navigate

OSX: Hear pronunciation of a word
I often use this command to learn pronunciation of unfamiliar words.

clear current line

Join lines
This command turns a multi-line file into a single line joined with <SOMETEXT>. To skip blank lines, use: $ perl -pe '(eof()||s/^\s*$//)||s/\n//g' file.txt

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

pngcrush all .png files in the directory
Nothing too magical here, just uses pngcrush to losslessly compress all your pngs!

Simple word scramble
enlubtsqyuse $ cat /tmp/out subsequently

Display the end of a logfile as new lines are added to the end


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: