Commands tagged bash (806)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Periodic Display of Fan Speed with Change Highlights
Uses the lm-sensors package in Linux to display fan speed. Grep RPM is used to discover lines containing the text RPM, and sed is used to edit out everything but the RPM number. The watch utility is used to update the display every 10 seconds and -d highlights any changes from the previous value. The eval function of Bash is used to execute the command enclosed in the ".." string.

Convert JSON to YAML
This is based on __unixmonkey73469__ answer. You will need to supply `--multiline 1` option to JSON importer if your .json is multiline (i.e. it was prettyfied) And you still need catmandu installed via `cpanm Catmandu`

Ergo browsing 'pacman' queries (Arch)
Alternative1 (grep support): pacman -Ss python | paste - - | grep --color=always -e '/python' | less -R Alternative2 (eye-candy, no grep): pacman --color=always -Ss "python" | paste - - | less -R in ~/.bashrc: pkg-grep() { pacman -Ss "$1" | paste - - | grep --color=always -e "${2:-$1}" | less -R ; } pkg-search() { pacman --color=always -Ss "python" | paste - - | less -R; }

Convert df command to posix; uber GREPable
It is a pain grep-ing/sed-ing/awk-ing plain old df. POSIX it!

Show display adapter, available drivers, and driver in use

Create a thumbnail from a video file

List all symbolic links in a directory matching a string
Finds all symbolic links in the specified directory which match the specified string pattern. I used this when upgrading from an Apple-supported version of Java 6 (1.6.0_65) to an Oracle-supported version (1.7.0_55) on Mac OS X 10.8.5 to find out which executables were pointing to /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/Versions/Current/Commands (Apple version) vs. /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.7.0_55.jdk/Contents/Home/bin (Oracle version). However, it appears the current JDK installation script already takes care of modifying the links.

url shortner using google's shortner api
First get a api key for google url shortner from here https://developers.google.com/url-shortener/ Then replace the API_KEY in the command

Which .service related this file?
I use this as an alias to get all .service files related a single installed file/conf (if it has services, of course). For rpm based systems ;)


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