Commands tagged function (130)

  • works with fractions like 1/3.5


    4
    awk "BEGIN{ print $* }"
    maelcum · 2010-10-07 16:13:41 0
  • like 7300, but doesn't clutter your working directory with old qr.*.png files. This will get the QR barcode, and send it right into ImageMagick's 'display' tool. Usage is the same as 7300; just call this function followed by the URL: qrurl http://xkcd.com


    4
    qrurl() { curl -sS "http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?chs=200x200&cht=qr&chld=H|0&chl=$1" -o - | display -filter point -resize 600x600 png:-; }
    __ · 2010-12-16 04:42:05 0
  • Unlike other methods that use pipes and exec software like tr or sed or subshells, this is an extremely fast way to print a line and will always be able to detect the terminal width or else defaults to 80. It uses bash builtins for printf and echo and works with printf that supports the non-POSIX `-v` option to store result to var instead of printing to stdout. Here it is in a function that lets you change the line character to use and the length with args, it also supports color escape sequences with the echo -e option. function L() { local l=; builtin printf -vl "%${2:-${COLUMNS:-`tput cols 2>&-||echo 80`}}s\n" && echo -e "${l// /${1:-=}}"; } With color: L "`tput setaf 3`=" 1. Use printf to store n space chars followed by a newline to an environment variable "l" where n is local environment variable from $COLUMNS if set, else it will use `tput cols` and if that fails it will default to 80. 2. If printf succeeds then echo `$l` that contains the chars, replacing all blank spaces with "-" (can be changed to anything you want). From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash-power-prompt.html Show Sample Output


    4
    printf -vl "%${COLUMNS:-`tput cols 2>&-||echo 80`}s\n" && echo ${l// /-};
    AskApache · 2016-09-25 10:37:20 0
  • Chronic Bash function: chronic 3600 time # Print the time in your shell every hour chronic 60 updatedb > /dev/null # update slocate every minute Note: use 'jobs' to list background tasks and fg/bg to take control of them.


    3
    chronic () { t=$1; shift; while true; do $@; sleep $t; done & }
    rhythmx · 2009-06-13 05:57:54 8
  • Substitute feh for the image viewer of your choice. display (part of imagemagick) seems to be a popular choice.


    3
    apod(){ local x=http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/;feh $x$(curl -s ${x}astropix.html|grep -Pom1 'image/\d+/.*\.\w+');}
    eightmillion · 2009-11-18 12:06:03 2
  • This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; ) For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5815/advanced-ls-output-using-find-for-formattedsortable-file-stat-info From my .bash_profile -> http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-11 23:31:03 0
  • Another alternative is to define a function: lower() { echo ${@,,} } lower StrinG Show Sample Output


    3
    s="StrinG"; echo ${s,,}
    karpoke · 2010-08-12 16:02:38 4
  • no need to reinvent the wheel. Thanks to the OP for the "obsolete" hint. 'declare' may come in pretty handy on systems paranoid about "up-to-dateness" Show Sample Output


    3
    typeset -f <function name>; declare -f <function name>
    unefunge · 2010-11-24 15:59:42 3
  • 1. you don't need to prepend the year with 20 - just use Y instead of y 2. you may want to make your function a bit more secure: buf () { cp ${1?filename not specified}{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }


    3
    buf () { cp $1{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }
    unefunge · 2010-12-14 14:02:03 0
  • This works even if there are spaces in any word in the command line. Show Sample Output


    3
    quietly() { "$@" > /dev/null 2>&1; }
    wipu · 2011-10-04 06:45:42 1
  • POSIX compliant arithmetic evaluation. = 10*2+3 Show Sample Output


    3
    =() { echo $(($*)); }
    xlz · 2013-05-03 04:27:07 1
  • Usage: google "[search string]" Example: google "something im searching for" This will launch firefox and execute a google search in a new tab with the provided search string. You must provide the path to your Firefox binary if using cygwin to $ff or create an alias like follows: alias firefox='/cygdrive/c/Program Files (x86)/Mozilla Firefox/firefox.exe' Most Linux flavors with Firefox installed will use just ff="firefox" and even OSX.


    3
    google() { gg="https://www.google.com/search?q="; ff="firefox"; if [[ $1 ]]; then "$ff" -new-tab "$gg"$(echo ${1//[^a-zA-Z0-9]/+}); else echo 'Usage: google "[seach term]"'; fi }
    lowjax · 2013-08-01 22:21:53 5
  • A wrapper around ssh to automatically provide logging and session handling. This function runs ssh, which runs screen, which runs script. . The logs and the screen session are stored on the server. This means you can leave a session running and re-attach to it later, or from another machine. . . Requirements: * Log sessions on a remote server * Transparent - nothing extra to type * No installation - nothing to copy to the server beforehand . Features: * Function wrapper delegating to ssh - so nothing to remember - uses .ssh/config as expected - passes your command line option to ssh * Self-contained: no scripts to install on the server * Uses screen(1), so is: - detachable - re-attachable - shareable * Records session using script(1) * Configurable log file location, which may contain variables or whitespace L="$HOME" # local variable L="\$HOME" # server variable L="some space" . Limitations: * Log dir/file may not contain '~' (which would require eval on the server) . . The sessions are named by the local user connecting to the server. Therefore if you detach and re-run the same command you will reconnect to your original session. If you want to connect/share another's session simply run: USER=bob ssh root@server . The command above is stripped down to an absolute minimum. A fully expanded and annotated version is available as a Gist (git pastebin): https://gist.github.com/flatcap/3c42326abeb1197ee714 . If you want to add timing info to script, change the command to: ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script --timing=\"$L-timing\" -f \"$L\"";} Show Sample Output


    3
    ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script -f \"$L\"";}
    flatcap · 2015-10-14 13:14:29 1
  • The Haversine formula determines the great-circle distance between two points on a sphere given their longitudes and latitudes. Show Sample Output


    3
    h(){ echo $@|awk '{d($1,$2,$3,$4);} function d(x,y,x2,y2,a,c,dx,dy){dx=r(x2-x);dy=r(y2-y);x=r(x);x2=r(x2);a=(sin(dx/2))^2+cos(x)*cos(x2)*(sin(dy/2))^2;c=2*atan2(sqrt(a),sqrt(1-a)); printf("%.4f",6372.8*c);} function r(g){return g*(3.1415926/180.);}';}
    mikhail · 2019-04-04 01:34:36 1
  • This provides a way to sort output based on the length of the line, so that shorter lines appear before longer lines. It's an addon to the sort that I've wanted for years, sometimes it's very useful. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    sortwc () { local L;while read -r L;do builtin printf "${#L}@%s\n" "$L";done|sort -n|sed -u 's/^[^@]*@//'; }
    AskApache · 2010-05-20 20:13:52 1
  • One of the first functions programmers learn is how to print a line. This is my 100% bash builtin function to do it, which makes it as optimal as a function can be. The COLUMNS environment variable is also set by bash (including bash resetting its value when you resize your term) so its very efficient. I like pretty-output in my shells and have experimented with several ways to output a line the width of the screen using a minimal amount of code. This is like version 9,000 lol. This function is what I use, though when using colors or other terminal features I create separate functions that call this one, since this is the lowest level type of function. It might be better named printl(), but since I use it so much it's more optimal to have the name contain less chars (both for my programming and for the internal workings). If you do use terminal escapes this will reset to default. tput sgr0 For implementation ideas, check my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    L(){ l=`builtin printf %${2:-$COLUMNS}s` && echo -e "${l// /${1:-=}}"; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-14 04:35:30 3
  • While going through the source code for the well known ps command, I read about some interesting things.. Namely, that there are a bunch of different fields that ps can try and enumerate for you. These are fields I was not able to find in the man pages, documentation, only in the source. Here is a longer function that goes through each of the formats recognized by the ps on your machine, executes it, and then prompts you whether you would like to add it or not. Adding it simply adds it to an array that is then printed when you ctrl-c or at the end of the function run. This lets you save your favorite ones and then see the command to put in your .bash_profile like mine at : http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Note that I had to do the exec method below in order to pause with read. t () { local r l a P f=/tmp/ps c='command ps wwo pid:6,user:8,vsize:8,comm:20' IFS=' '; trap 'exec 66 exec 66 $f && command ps L | tr -s ' ' >&$f; while read -u66 l >&/dev/null; do a=${l/% */}; $c,$a k -${a//%/} -A; yn "Add $a" && P[$SECONDS]=$a; done } Show Sample Output


    2
    for p in `ps L|cut -d' ' -f1`;do echo -e "`tput clear;read -p$p -n1 p`";ps wwo pid:6,user:8,comm:10,$p kpid -A;done
    AskApache · 2010-10-12 06:42:10 2
  • This uses some tricks I found while reading the bash man page to enumerate and display all the current environment variables, including those not listed by the 'env' command which according to the bash docs are more for internal use by BASH. The main trick is the way bash will list all environment variable names when performing expansion on ${!A*}. Then the eval builtin makes it work in a loop. I created a function for this and use it instead of env. (by aliasing env). This is the function that given any parameters lists the variables that start with it. So 'aae B' would list all env variables starting wit B. And 'aae {A..Z} {a..z}' would list all variables starting with any letter of the alphabet. And 'aae TERM' would list all variables starting with TERM. aae(){ local __a __i __z;for __a in "$@";do __z=\${!${__a}*};for __i in `eval echo "${__z}"`;do echo -e "$__i: ${!__i}";done;done; } And my printenv replacement is: alias env='aae {A..Z} {a..z} "_"|sort|cat -v 2>&1 | sed "s/\\^\\[/\\\\033/g"' From: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    for _a in {A..Z} {a..z};do _z=\${!${_a}*};for _i in `eval echo "${_z}"`;do echo -e "$_i: ${!_i}";done;done|cat -Tsv
    AskApache · 2010-10-27 07:16:54 0
  • pushd and popd are your friends, but sometimes they're just incompatible with the way one works... Two shell functions: bm bookmarkname - "bookmarks" the current directory, just 'cd $BMbookmarkname' to return to it. forget bookmarkname - unsets the 'bookmarkname' variable. It isn't mandatory, they cease to exist when the session ends. Show Sample Output


    2
    bm() { export BM${1?"bookmark name missing"}="$PWD" ; }; forget() { unset BM${1?"bookmark name missing"} ; }
    unefunge · 2010-11-19 12:15:11 0
  • Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too. On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login: LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto' and alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS' which works great. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
    h3xx · 2011-08-15 03:10:58 0
  • typeset command gives to stdout all the functions defined in a bash session, -f and -F switches are for: all functions names with body (-f) and all functions names only (-F). Show Sample Output


    2
    typeset -f
    kLeZ · 2012-09-17 13:48:39 1
  • Thanks to knoppix5 for the idea :-) Print selected lines from a file or the output of a command. Usage: every NTH MAX [FILE] Print every NTH line (from the first MAX lines) of FILE. If FILE is omitted, stdin is used. The command simply passes the input to a sed script: sed -n -e "${2}q" -e "0~${1}p" ${3:-/dev/stdin} print no output sed -n quit after this many lines (controlled by the second parameter) -e "${2}q" print every NTH line (controlled by the first parameter) -e "0~${1}p" take input from $3 (if it exists) otherwise use /dev/stdin {3:-/dev/stdin} Show Sample Output


    2
    function every() { sed -n -e "${2}q" -e "0~${1}p" ${3:-/dev/stdin}; }
    flatcap · 2015-04-03 01:30:36 4

  • 2
    function stringContains() { [ -z "$1" ] || { [ -z "${2##*$1*}" ] && [ -n "$2" ];};}
    mikhail · 2019-04-12 20:51:27 1
  • The simpler, 1-arg version is save_function(){ { date +"# %F.%T $1; declare -f "$1";}| tee -a ~/.bash_functions; }` Show Sample Output


    2
    save_function(){ while [[ $# > 0 ]]; do { date +"# %F.%T $1; declare -f "$1";}| tee -a ~/.bash_functions; shift; done;}
    mcint · 2019-07-17 01:06:59 2
  • I was looking for the fastest way to create a bunch of ansi escapes for use in echo -e commands throughout a lot of my shell scripts. This is what I came up with, and I actually stick that loop command in a function and then just call that at the beginning of my scripts to not clutter the environment with these escape codes, which can wreck havok on my terminal when I'm dumping the environment. More of a cool way to store escape ansi codes in an array. You can echo them like: echo -e "${CC[15]}This text is black on bright green background." I usually just use with a function: # setup_colors - Adds colors to array CC for global use # 30 - Black, 31 - Red, 32 - Green, 33 - Yellow, 34 - Blue, 35 - Magenta, 36 - Blue/Green, 37 - White, 30/42 - Black on Green '30\;42' function setup_colors(){ declare -ax CC; for i in `seq 0 7`;do ii=$(($i+7));CC[$i]="\033[1;3${i}m";CC[$ii]="\033[0;3${i}m";done;CC[15]="\033[30;42m"; export R='\033[0;00m';export X="\033[1;37m"; }; export -f setup_colors CC[15] has a background of bright green which is why it is separate. R resets everything, and X is my default font of bright white. CC[15]="\033[30;42m"; R=$'\033[0;00m'; X=$'\033[1;37m' Those are just my favorite colors that I often use in my scripts. You can test which colors by running for i in $(seq 0 $((${#CC[@]} - 1))); do echo -e "${CC[$i]}[$i]\n$R"; done See: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html for more usage. Show Sample Output


    1
    declare -ax CC; for i in `seq 0 7`;do ii=$(($i+7)); CC[$i]="\033[1;3${i}m"; CC[$ii]="\033[0;3${i}m"; done
    AskApache · 2009-09-21 07:00:55 4
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Turns red the stderr output
Reference: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4455706

convert a web page into a png
This requires the command-line print extension (see #2861 for more details). I use it to make up complex images with formatted text using CSS and whatnot. It's a lot slicker than imagemagick for certain things. Now imagine using a local webserver with PHP and a database to generate the images. Oh, the possibilities...

MP3 player
I tried a few curses based mp3 players for playing back choir practice songs for my wife. Unfortunately none of the ones I tried were capable of scrubbing a track. Firefox saves the day.

Extract a IRC like chat log out of an Adium xml logfile

Content search.
Grep will read the contents of each file in PWD and will use the REs $1 $2 ... $n to match the contents. In case of match, grep will print the appropriate file, line number and the matching line. It's just easier to write $ ff word1 word2 word3 Instead of $ grep -rinE 'word1|word2|word3' .

Continue a current job in the background

Show memory usage of all docker / lxc containers

List empty any directories

tail: watch a filelog
-f file(s) to be monitorized -n number of last line to be printed on the screen in this example, the content of two files are displayed

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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