Commands tagged vim (143)

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Check if system is 32bit or 64bit
Needed a quick way to see if my server distro that I setup years ago was running 32bit or not, since with time I had forgotten. Note: does not check _hardware_ e.g. /proc/cpuinfo but rather the kernel installed

List files with quotes around each filename

increase recursively the modification time for a list of files
Increase the modification date for the files selected with the find command.

Short one line while loop that outputs parameterized content from one file to another
The above is an example of grabbing only the first column. You can define the start and end points specifically by chacater position using the following command: $ while read l; do echo ${l:10:40}; done < three-column-list.txt > column-c10-c40.txt Of course, it doesn't have to be a column, or extraction, it can be replacement $ while read l; do echo ${l/foo/bar}; done < list-with-foo.txt > list-with-bar.txt Read more about parameter expansion here: http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/pe Think of this as an alternative to awk or sed for file operations

find out which directories in /home have the most files currently open

Search some text from all files inside a directory

convert filenames in current directory to lowercase
This will convert filenames from uppercase to lowercase. I find this useful after downloading images from my digital camera. This works for English, but other languages may need something slightly more complex like this: $ for i in *; do mv "$i" "$(echo $i|tr [:upper:] [:lower:])"; done Also, the quote marks aren't necessary if your filenames don't contain spaces.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

List the most recent dates in reverse-chronological order


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