Commands tagged vim (141)

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Direct auto-complete in bash
Direct auto-complete in bash

Compare / diff two images
Outputs the number of different pixels. 2 params to increase tolerance: * thumbnails size * fuzz, the color distance tolerance See http://en.positon.org/post/Compare-/-diff-between-two-images for more details.

Recursively remove all empty directories

Format ps command output
ps command gives the possibility to display information with custom formatting with the -o options followed by the format specifier list.

Check how far along (in %) your program is in a file
Say you're started "xzcat bigdata.xz | complicated-processing-program >summary" an hour ago, and you of course forgot to enable progress output (you could've just put "awk 'NR%1000==0{print NR>"/dev/stderr"}{print}'" in the pipeline but it's too late for that now). But you really want some idea of how far along your program is. Then you can run the above command to see how many % along xzcat is in reading the file. Note that this is for the GNU/Linux version of lsof; the one found on e.g. Darwin has slightly different output so the awk part may need some tweaks.

One-liner to generate Self-Signed SSL Certificate+Key without any annoying prompts or CSRs
Handy if you want to quickly generate a self-signed certificate. Also can be used in your automated scripts for generating quick-use certificates.

Show directories in the PATH, one per line
The output of "echo $PATH" is hard to read, this is much easier. The parentheses ensure that the change to the input field separator (IFS) only happens the the sub shell and not affecting the current shell.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

generate random tone

Copy files and directories from a remote machine to the local machine
This command will copy files and directories from a remote machine to the local one. Ensure you are in the local directory you want to populate with the remote files before running the command. To copy a directory and it's contents, you could: $ ssh user@host "(cd /path/to/a/directory ; tar cvf - ./targetdir)" | tar xvf - This is especially useful on *nix'es that don't have 'scp' installed by default.


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