Commands tagged vim (143)

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Synchronise a file from a remote server
You will be prompted for a password unless you have your public keys set-up.

Open (in vim) all modified files in a git repository
For editing files added to the index: $ vim `git diff --name-only --cached` To edit all changed files: $ vim `git diff --name-only HEAD` To edit changed files matching glob: $ vim `git diff --name-only -- '*.html'` If the commands needs to support filenames with whitespace, it gets a bit hacky (see http://superuser.com/questions/336016/invoking-vi-through-find-xargs-breaks-my-terminal-why for the reason): $ git diff --name-only -z | xargs -0 bash -c '

Find the package that installed a command

Using ASCII Art output on MPlayer
Not so useful. Just a cool feature.

Print all fields in a file/output from field N to the end of the line

Kill any process with one command using program name
Somtime one wants to kill process not by name of executable, but by a parameter name. In such cases killall is not suitable method.

List all commands present on system

Print Memory Utilization Percentage For a specific process and it's children
Change the name of the process and what is echoed to suit your needs. The brackets around the h in the grep statement cause grep to skip over "grep httpd", it is the equivalent of grep -v grep although more elegant.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

One-liner to generate Self-Signed SSL Certificate+Key without any annoying prompts or CSRs
Handy if you want to quickly generate a self-signed certificate. Also can be used in your automated scripts for generating quick-use certificates.


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