Commands tagged PID (10)

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Check SSH public and private keys matching
Tested in bash4

Mortality Countdown
watch the seconds of your life tick away - replace YYYY-mm-dd HH:MM:ss w/ your birthtime.

find text in a file
this will find text in the directory you specify and give you line where it appears.

Search commandlinefu from the CLI
html2text: http://www.mbayer.de/html2text/

Which Twitter user are you?
This will tell you which twitter user you are chronologically. For example, a number of 500 means you were the 500th user to create a twitter account.

A very quick and slick fork bomb. Handle with care. Don't run on production please...

Find name of package which installed a given shell command
Some command names are very different from the name of the package that installed them. Sometimes, you may want to find out the name of the package that provided a command on a system, so that you can install it on another system.

Output Windows services in a neatly formated list (cygwin)
Outputs Windows Services service name and display name using "sc query", pipes the output to "awk" for processing, then "column" for formatting. List All Services: $ sc query state= all | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: List Started Services: $sc query | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: List Stopped Services: $sc query state= inactive| awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\:

Remove a line from a file using sed (useful for updating known SSH server keys when they change)

how to export a table in .csv file
Exports the result of query in a csv file


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