Commands tagged password (51)

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draw line separator
Even shorter: $ seq -s '*' 120|tr -d '[0-9]'

Check whether IPv6 is enabled
Checks whether IPv6 is enabled system-wide by reading from procfs.

How to stop MAC Address via IPTables
edit the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file and try to work whit this: -A INPUT -i (interface) -m mac (mac address) -j ACCEPT/DROP

see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network
see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network

search installed files of package, that doesn't remember his name well. On rpm systems
rpm, sometimes, is not wildcard friendly. To search files installed from package this could be useful. change PACKAGENAME to any package do you want to search

Virtualbox rsync copy (without defining any virtualbox configuration)
That is, after running `vagrant ssh-config` to determine ports and ip's: $ vagrant ssh-config Host default HostName 127.0.0.1 User vagrant Port 2200 UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null StrictHostKeyChecking no PasswordAuthentication no IdentityFile /Users/romanvg/tmp/.vagrant/machines/default/virtualbox/private_key IdentitiesOnly yes LogLevel FATAL

sudo for launching gui apps in background
Need package: gksu Note: Launching gui app in background that needs sudo, won't work great with our old friendly style of launching: $ sudo gedit /etc/passwd & because this would put sudo in background ! Using gksudo as demonstrated, would popup a gui sudo window. May be this is a common knowledge, but not knowing this frustrated me during my newbie year.

Find the processes that are on the runqueue. Processes with a status of
Want to know why your load average is so high? Run this command to see what processes are on the run queue. Runnable processes have a status of "R", and commands waiting on I/O have a status of "D". On some older versions of Linux may require -emo instead of -eo. On Solaris: ps -aefL -o s -o user -o comm | egrep "^O|^R|COMMAND"

Query Wikipedia via console over DNS
Query Wikipedia by issuing a DNS query for a TXT record. The TXT record will also include a short URL to the complete corresponding Wikipedia entry.You can also write a little shell script like: $ $ cat wikisole.sh $ #!/bin/sh $ dig +short txt ${1}.wp.dg.cx and run it like $ ./wikisole.sh unix were your first option ($1) will be used as search term.

Use file(1) to view device information
file(1) can print details about certain devices in the /dev/ directory (block devices in this example). This helped me to know at a glance the location and revision of my bootloader, UUIDs, filesystem status, which partitions were primaries / logicals, etc.. without running several commands. See also: $ file -s /dev/dm-* $ file -s /dev/cciss/* etc..


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