Commands tagged harddisk (4)

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background a wget download

Type a random string into a X11 window
Just after you type enter, you have 3 seconds to switch window, then "texthere" will be "typed" in the X11 application that has focus. Very useful to beat your score at games such as "How fast can you type A-Z".

Clone all repos from a user with lynx
https://wuseman.github.io/wcloner/

Convert JSON to YAML
This is based on __unixmonkey73469__ answer. You will need to supply `--multiline 1` option to JSON importer if your .json is multiline (i.e. it was prettyfied) And you still need catmandu installed via `cpanm Catmandu`

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

one-line log format for svn
the output of svn log is annoying to grep, since it spreads the useful info over multiple lines. This compacts the output down to one line so eg you can grep for a comment and see the rev, date & committer straight away. Updated: MUCH shorter, easier to remember. Now it just replaces newlines with spaces, except on '---' lines.

List all symbolic links in current directory
For those who don't have the symlinks command, you can use readlink. This command is not straightforward because readlink is very picky. The backslash in front of 'ls' means not to use an alias (e.g. color escape codes from an aliased 'ls' could mess up readlink), and the -1 (one) means to print the entries separated by newlines. xargs -l (the letter L) means to process each input separated by newlines as separate commands.

Produce a pseudo random password with given length in base 64

Extract title from HTML files
not the best, uses 4 pipes!

Printable random characters
Reads psuedorandom bytes from /dev/urandom, filtering out non-printable ones. Other character classes can be used, such as [:alpha:], [:digit:] and [:alnum:]. To get a string of 10 lowercase letters: $ tr -dc '[:lower:]' < /dev/urandom | head -c 10


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