Commands tagged Debian (99)

  • Trickle is here: http://monkey.org/~marius/pages/?page=trickle Trickle is a simple bandwidth limiter


    1
    trickle sudo apt-get update -y
    mrman · 2011-02-15 02:05:37 0
  • locating packages held back, such as with "aptitude hold "


    1
    aptitude search ~ahold
    pykler · 2012-04-29 15:02:32 0
  • The other commands were good, but they included packages that were installed and then removed. This command only shows packages that are currently installed, sorts smallest to largest, and formats the sizes to be human readable. Show Sample Output


    1
    dpkg-query --show --showformat='${Package;-50}\t${Installed-Size}\n' `aptitude --display-format '%p' search '?installed!?automatic'` | sort -k 2 -n | grep -v deinstall | awk '{printf "%.3f MB \t %s\n", $2/(1024), $1}'
    EvilDennisR · 2013-07-26 23:18:20 0
  • In this case, linux- is the prefix; simply running apt-cache pkgnames would list every package APT knows about. The default APT config assumes -g, --generate; to use the cache as/is, you could similarly run: apt-cache --no-generate pkgnames [prefix] Adding --all-names, like so: apt-cache --no-generate --all-names pkgnames [prefix] would print all the packages APT knows about, using the cache as/is, including virtual packages and missing dependencies. This command was shamelessly stolen from the apt-cache(8) man-page. Show Sample Output


    1
    apt-cache pkgnames linux-
    benjabean1 · 2014-12-14 06:48:57 0
  • An alternative without aptitude.


    1
    apt-mark showmanual|xargs sudo apt-mark markauto
    DellDor · 2015-08-10 02:35:22 0
  • If, for example, you want to remove all kernels and headers but the last three versions, you can't use one of that magic all-in-one "remove old stuff" commands. With this simple but elegant command you can remove a range of versions, or a list of versions with e.g. {14,16,20}. Show Sample Output


    1
    apt purge linux*{14..18}*
    ppq · 2016-04-20 07:44:55 0
  • Some command names are very different from the name of the package that installed them. Sometimes, you may want to find out the name of the package that provided a command on a system, so that you can install it on another system. Show Sample Output


    1
    dpkg -S "$(readlink -e $(which w))" | cut -d ':' -f 1
    Fox · 2016-05-18 09:41:29 0
  • The vaule is expressed in megabytes Show Sample Output


    1
    echo $[ ($(dpkg-query -s $(dpkg --get-selections | grep -oP '^.*(?=\binstall)') | grep -oP '(?<=Installed-Size: )\d+' | tr '\n' '+' | sed 's/+$//')) / 1024 ]
    acavagni · 2019-06-02 16:35:34 0
  • OS: Debian based (or those that use dpkg) Equivalent to doing a dpkg -S on each file in $PATH, but way faster. May report files generated though postinstall scripts and such. For example . It will report /usr/bin/vim .. which is not not a file installed directly by dpkg, but a link generated by alternatives hooks


    0
    echo -e "${PATH//://\n}" >/tmp/allpath; grep -Fh -f /tmp/allpath /var/lib/dpkg/info/*.list|grep -vxh -f /tmp/allpath >/tmp/installedinpath ; find ${PATH//:/ } |grep -Fxv -f /tmp/installedinpath
    kamathln · 2009-09-09 05:33:14 1
  • List packages and their disk usage in decreasing order. This uses the "Installed-Size" from the package metadata. It may differ from the actual used space, because e.g. data files (think of databases) or log files may take additional space. Show Sample Output


    0
    perl -ne '$pkg=$1 if m/^Package: (.*)/; print "$1\t$pkg\n" if m/^Installed-Size: (.*)/;' < /var/lib/dpkg/status | sort -rn | less
    hfs · 2009-10-19 12:55:59 1

  • 0
    dpkg-query -W -f='${Version}' package-name
    ohe · 2010-06-02 14:39:08 0
  • Supports regex pattern and very flexible output parameters and search options. Show Sample Output


    0
    aptitude -F '%p %v#' search <pattern>
    unixmonkey10157 · 2010-06-03 15:37:27 0
  • A replacement for 'apt-cache' that uses a Xapian to produce ranked results. Available in 'apt-xapian-index' 0.27 and higher. Show Sample Output


    0
    axi-cache search <searchterm>
    tarkasteve · 2010-07-05 00:16:03 0
  • Lists all packages in "rc" state and purge them one at a time.


    0
    dpkg -l | grep ^rc | cut -d' ' -f3 | xargs dpkg -P
    cyrusza · 2010-11-22 12:53:31 2

  • 0
    debconf-copydb configdb copydb --pattern=<PACKAGE> --config="Name: copydb" --config="Driver: File" --config="Filename: ~/copydebconf.dat"
    ohe · 2011-08-29 14:00:42 0

  • 0
    debconf-copydb copydb configdb --config="Name: copydb" --config ="Driver: File" --config="Filename: ~/copydebconf.dat"
    ohe · 2011-08-29 14:01:31 0
  • since awk was already there one can use it instead of the 2 greps. might not be faster, but fast enough


    0
    apt-get remove $(dpkg -l | awk "/^ii linux-(image|headers)/ && ! /`uname -r`/ {print \$2}")
    _john · 2011-10-09 13:58:47 0
  • after kernel build with make deb-pkg, I like to install the 4 newest packages that exist in the directory. Beware: might be fewer for you....


    0
    sudo dpkg -i `ls -tr *.deb | tail -n4`
    _john · 2011-10-09 14:20:11 0
  • This will print the name of every installed package on a Debian system.


    0
    aptitude search ~i -F %p
    dbbolton · 2011-10-15 00:31:10 1
  • # Search for an available package on Debian systems using a regex so it only matches packages starting with 'tin'.


    0
    aptitude search ^tin
    defiantredpill · 2011-10-20 17:51:36 0
  • Marks all manually installed deb packages as automatically installed. Usefull to combine with apt-get install <all manually packages that we want> to have a clean installed debian-based system.


    0
    aptitude -F "%p" search \!~M~i~T | xargs apt-mark markauto
    gspadari · 2012-03-09 13:44:00 0
  • also use: update-alternatives --config gnome-www-browser


    0
    update-alternatives --config x-www-browser
    gwd · 2012-07-08 20:27:42 1
  • This functionality seems to be missing from commands like dpkg. Ideally, I want to duplicate the behavior of rpm --verify, but it seems difficult to do this in one relatively short command pipeline. Show Sample Output


    0
    dpkg-query -Wf '${Package}\n' | xargs dpkg --status | sed '/^Conffiles:/,/^Description:/!d;//d' | awk '{print $2 " " $1}' | md5sum -c 2>/dev/null | grep FAILED$ | cut -f1 -d':'
    hallmarc · 2013-01-31 16:52:38 0

  • 0
    sudo cp /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/Paris /etc/localtime
    egeoffray · 2013-03-14 11:53:09 0

  • 0
    salt -G 'os_family:Debian' cmd.run 'apt-get dist-upgrade --dry-run | grep ^Inst | cut -d" " -f2'
    hinnerk · 2013-06-22 22:57:47 0
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Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

Rename files in batch

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

encrypt whole line with ROT13 in vim

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

export iPad App list to txt file
This will generate the same output without changing the current directory, and filepath will be relative to the current directory. Note: it will (still) fail if your iTunes library is in a non-standard location.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Display the standard deviation of a column of numbers with awk
This will calculate a running standard deviation in one pass and should never have the possibility for overflow that can happen with other implementations. I suppose there is a potential for underflow in the corner case where the deltas are small or the values themselves are small.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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