Commands tagged osx (61)

  • speaks out last twitter update using 'say'


    -1
    curl "http://api.twitter.com/1/statuses/user_timeline.xml?count=1&screen_name=barackobama" | egrep -w "<text>(.*)</text>" | sed -E "s/<\/?text>//g" | say
    beerdeaap · 2012-02-27 18:46:33 0
  • http://github.com/c3w/ash . a Ruby SSH helper script . reads a JSON config file to read host, FQDN, user, port, tunnel options . changes OSX Terminal profiles based on host 'type' USAGE: put 'ash' ruby script in your PATH modify and copy ashrc-dist to ~/.ashrc configure OSX Terminal profiles, such as "webserver", "development", etc run "ash myhostname" and away you go! v.2 will re-attach to a 'screen' named in your ~/.ashrc Show Sample Output


    -1
    ash prod<tab>
    c3w · 2012-05-12 19:51:02 0
  • Group membership in OS X is a mish-mash of standards that end up meaning there's almost a half-dozen of ways to belong to a group, what with group inheritance and automatic assignment. This means there's no easy command to find out all groups a user belongs to. The only sensible way then is to list all users and then query each user for membership. NOTE: This is a function. Once input you can execute it by calling with a groupname. Show Sample Output


    -1
    members () { dscl . -list /Users | while read user; do printf "$user "; dsmemberutil checkmembership -U "$user" -G "$*"; done | grep "is a member" | cut -d " " -f 1; };
    eduo · 2012-05-20 11:34:33 0

  • -1
    diskutil list
    grahamperrin · 2012-10-06 21:18:27 0
  • Uses find, plutil and xpath. Note: Some applications don't have proper information. system_profiler might be better to use. It's a bit slow query. Due to command length limit, I removed -name "*.app" and CFBundleName. Show Sample Output


    -1
    find /Applications -type d -maxdepth 1 -exec sh -c 'echo "{}"; (plutil -convert xml1 -o - "{}/Contents/Info.plist" | xpath /dev/stdin "concat(\"v\", /plist/dict/string[preceding-sibling::key[1]=\"CFBundleShortVersionString\"]/node())" 2>/dev/null)' \;
    darkfader · 2013-03-29 14:01:23 0

  • -2
    hdid somefile.dmg
    rnoyfb · 2010-01-15 12:00:48 2
  • I often run some command that takes a while to finish. By putting the say command afterward, I get an audio notification. Please note that this command (say) only works on Mac OS X and not Linux.


    -2
    long_command; say I am all done
    haivu · 2010-01-27 19:03:01 1
  • Instead of having someone else read you the Digg headlines, Have OSX do it. Requires Curl+Sed+Say. This could probably be easily modified to use espeak for Linux.


    -2
    IFS=`echo -en "\n\b"`; for i in $(curl http://feeds.digg.com/digg/container/technology/popular.rss | grep '<title>' | sed -e 's#<[^>]*>##g' | tail -n10); do echo $i; echo $i | sed 's/^/Did you hear about /g' | say; sleep 30; done
    echosedawk · 2010-06-07 22:16:19 1

  • -3
    sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 1
    therod · 2009-04-28 19:53:57 0
  • This command will open up the two files in FileMerge on OS X. You can also compare two directories. opendiff directory1 directory2 NOTE: FileMerge is a part of the OS X Developer Tools, available on the install disc.


    -3
    opendiff <file1> <file2>
    claytron · 2009-06-16 03:22:52 3
  • Hide-and-Seek is one of the greatest games in the parent's arsenal. Your kid runs off and hides for several minutes, while waiting for you to find him/her. This gives you time to catch a breath and check your email without feeling like a loser. If you'd also like to take advantage of the counting time--claiming that thinking space as your own--use this command on your OSX terminal to maximize downtime. Also, if your kid is like mine, you can get away with "for i in {1..100};" :)


    -3
    txt="";for i in {1..20};do txt=$txt"$i. ";done;say $txt" Ready or not, here I come"
    antic · 2011-12-11 05:51:22 3
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