Commands tagged tr (73)

  • shorter than alternative


    17
    printf "%`tput cols`s"|tr ' ' '#'
    kamathln · 2010-04-05 17:12:35 0
  • Print a row of characters across the terminal. Uses tput to establish the current terminal width, and generates a line of characters just long enough to cross it. In the example '#' is used. It's possible to use a repeating sequence by dividing the columns by the number of characters in the sequence like this: seq -s'~-' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /2 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]' or seq -s'-~?' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /3 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]' You will lose chararacters at the end if the length isn't cleanly divisible. Show Sample Output


    6
    seq -s'#' 0 $(tput cols) | tr -d '[:digit:]'
    jgc · 2010-04-01 09:06:44 0

  • -6
    find . -type d -name '*[A-Z]*' -execdir bash -c '! test -f "$(echo "$0" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]")"' {} \; -execdir bash -c 'mv "$0" "$(echo "$0" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]")"' {} \;
    ashawley · 2010-04-01 04:35:52 1
  • It is helpful to know the current limits placed on your account, and using this shortcut is a quick way to figuring out which values to change for optimization or security. Alias is: alias ulimith="command ulimit -a|sed 's/^.*\([a-z]\))\(.*\)$/-\1\2/;s/^/ulimit /'|tr '\n' ' ';echo" Here's the result of this command: ulimit -c 0 -d unlimited -e 0 -f unlimited -i 155648 -l 32 -m unlimited -n 8192 -p 8 -q 819200 -r 0 -s 10240 -t unlimited -u unlimited -v unlimited -x unlimited ulimit -a core file size (blocks, -c) 0 data seg size (kbytes, -d) unlimited scheduling priority (-e) 0 file size (blocks, -f) unlimited pending signals (-i) 155648 max locked memory (kbytes, -l) 32 max memory size (kbytes, -m) unlimited open files (-n) 8192 pipe size (512 bytes, -p) 8 POSIX message queues (bytes, -q) 819200 real-time priority (-r) 0 stack size (kbytes, -s) 10240 cpu time (seconds, -t) unlimited max user processes (-u) unlimited virtual memory (kbytes, -v) unlimited file locks (-x) unlimited Show Sample Output


    2
    echo "ulimit `ulimit -a|sed -e 's/^.*\([a-z]\))\(.*\)$/-\1\2/'|tr "\n" ' '`"
    AskApache · 2010-03-12 06:46:54 1

  • 2
    grep current_state= /var/log/nagios/status.dat|sort|uniq -c|sed -e "s/[\t ]*\([0-9]*\).*current_state=\([0-9]*\)/\2:\1/"|tr "\n" " "
    c3w · 2010-03-11 06:04:14 0
  • This is a minimalistic version of the ubiquitious Google definition screen scraper. This version was designed not only to run fast, but to work using BusyBox. BusyBox is a collection of basic Unix tools that have been compiled into a single binary to save space on tiny installations of Unix. For example, although my phone doesn't have perl or the GNU utilities, it does have BusyBox's stripped down versions of wget, tr, and sed. It turns out that those tools suffice for many tasks. Known Bugs: This script does not handle HTML entities at all. I don't think there's an easy way to do that within BusyBox, but I'd love to see it if someone could do it. Also, this script can only define a single word, not phrases. (Well, you could if you typed in %20, but that'd be gross.) Lastly, this script does not show the URL where definitions were found. Given the randomness of the Net, that last bit of information is often key. Show Sample Output


    0
    wget -q -U busybox -O- "http://www.google.com/search?ie=UTF8&q=define%3A$1" | tr '<' '\n' | sed -n 's/^li>\(.*\)/\1\n/p'
    hackerb9 · 2010-02-01 13:01:47 1
  • Use if you have pictures all over the place and you want to copy them to a central location Synopsis: Find jpg files translate all file names to lowercase backup existing, don't overwrite, preserve mode ownership and timestamps copy to a central location


    4
    find . -iname "*.jpg" -print0 | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]' | xargs -0 cp --backup=numbered -dp -u --target-directory {location} &
    oracular · 2009-12-10 08:47:04 0
  • This is similar to how you would generate a file with all zeros dd if=/dev/zero of=allzeros bs=1024 count=2k


    4
    tr '\000' '\377' < /dev/zero | dd of=allones bs=1024 count=2k
    azeey · 2009-12-08 16:05:28 1

  • 2
    tr -c -d 0-9 < /dev/urandom | head -c 10
    hfs · 2009-10-09 11:58:30 0
  • Transforms a file to all uppercase.


    6
    tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]' <"$1"
    opexxx · 2009-10-08 11:34:07 0
  • Also searches for aliases and shell builtins Show Sample Output


    4
    type <filename>
    danam · 2009-09-14 09:37:23 1

  • 1
    which <filename>
    Hal_Pomeranz · 2009-09-12 00:51:24 2
  • Searches in order of the directories of $PATH. Stops after finding the entry; looks for only that fileName. Works in Bourne, Korn, Bash and Z shells. Show Sample Output


    -1
    for L in `echo :$PATH | tr : '\n'`; do F=${L:-"."}/fileName; if [ -f ${F} -o -h ${F} ]; then echo ${F}; break; fi; done
    arcege · 2009-09-11 16:14:36 0
  • This version uses Pipes, but is easier for the common user to grasp... instead of using sed or some other more complicated method, it uses the tr command Show Sample Output


    15
    echo $PATH | tr \: \\n
    crk · 2009-09-09 02:10:04 2

  • 0
    dos2unix file.txt
    sklm · 2009-08-19 13:23:48 0

  • 0
    dd if=/dev/urandom count=200 bs=1 2>/dev/null | tr "\n" " " | sed 's/[^a-zA-Z0-9]//g' | cut -c-16
    amaymon · 2009-08-07 06:32:55 2
  • Save the script as: sort_file Usage: sort_file < sort_me.csv > out_file.csv This script was originally posted by Admiral Beotch in LinuxQuestions.org on the Linux-Software forum. I modified this script to make it more portable. Show Sample Output


    0
    infile=$1 for i in $(cat $infile) do echo $i | tr "," "\n" | sort -n | tr "\n" "," | sed "s/,$//" echo done
    iframe · 2009-07-12 21:23:37 0
  • Puts words on new lines, removing additional newlines.


    -1
    < <infile> tr ' \t' '\n' | tr -s '\n' > <outfile>
    qubyte · 2009-07-07 01:17:47 2
  • Helpful when we want to do mass file renaming(especially mp3s). Show Sample Output


    0
    echo "${STRING}" | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]' | awk '{print toupper(substr($0,1,1))substr($0,2);}'
    mohan43u · 2009-06-23 21:11:34 5
  • curl doesn't provide url-encoding for 'GET' data, it have an option '--data-urlencode', but its only for 'POST' data. Thats why I need to write down this commandline. With 'perl', 'php' and 'python', this is one liner, but just I wrote it for fun. Works in Ubuntu, will work in all linux varients(I hope it will work in unix varients also). Show Sample Output


    -3
    (Command too long..See sample Output..)
    mohan43u · 2009-06-14 20:34:37 0
  • Obviously, you can replace 'man' command with any command in this command line to do useful things. I just want to mention that there is a way to list all the commands which you can execute directly without giving fullpath. Normally all important commands will be placed in your PATH directories. This commandline uses that variable to get commands. Works in Ubuntu, will work in all 'manpage' configured *nix systems. Show Sample Output


    3
    find `echo "${PATH}" | tr ':' ' '` -type f | while read COMMAND; do man -f "${COMMAND##*/}"; done
    mohan43u · 2009-06-13 19:56:24 1
  • This command might not be useful for most of us, I just wanted to share it to show power of command line. Download simple text version of novel David Copperfield from Poject Gutenberg and then generate a single column of words after which occurences of each word is counted by sort | uniq -c combination. This command removes numbers and single characters from count. I'm sure you can write a shorter version. Show Sample Output


    -4
    wget -q -O- http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/cprfd10.txt | sed '1,419d' | tr "\n" " " | tr " " "\n" | perl -lpe 's/\W//g;$_=lc($_)' | grep "^[a-z]" | awk 'length > 1' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"\t"$1}'
    alperyilmaz · 2009-05-04 16:00:39 8
  • This will, for an application that has already been removed but had its configuration left behind, purge that configuration from the system. To test it out first, you can remove the last -y, and it will show you what it will purge without actually doing it. I mean it never hurts to check first, "just in case." ;)


    -3
    dpkg-query -l| grep -v "ii " | grep "rc " | awk '{print $2" "}' | tr -d "\n" | xargs aptitude purge -y
    thepicard · 2009-04-28 19:25:53 3
  •  < 1 2 3

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: