Commands tagged X (21)

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Who needs pipes?
or: C

rot13 simple substitution cipher via command line
E.g. Useful for hiding spoilers in reviews, etc.

Search for a word in less
Although less behaves more or less like vim in certain aspects, the vim regex for word boundaries (\< and \>) do not work in less. Instead, use \b to denote a word boundary. Therefore, if you want to search for, say, the word "exit", but do not want to search for exiting, exits, etc., then surround "exit" with \b. This is useful if you need to search for specific occurrences of a keyword or command. \b can also be used at just the beginning and end, if needed.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

type partial command, kill this command, check something you forgot, yank the command, resume typing.
Example : $ vim /etc/fstab ## damn $ $ sudo ## like a boss. Example 2 : $ sudo vim /root/bin/ ##uh... autocomplete doesn't work... $ $ sudo ls /root/bin ##ah! that's the name of the file! $ sudo vim /root/bin/ ##resume here! Thanks readline!

Pronounce an English word using Dictionary.com
This one uses dictionary.com

Create the authorization header required for a Twitter stream feed
This is the FOURTH in a set of five commands. Please see my other commands for the previous three steps. This command builds the authorization header required by Twitter. For this command to work, see my previous 3 commands (step1, step2 and step3) as they are required to build the environment variables used in this command. For more information on the authorization header, go to dev.twitter.com/apps, click on any of your apps (or create a new one) and then click on the "OAuth Tool" tab.

Mac OS X: Change Color of the ls Command
I use terminal with black background on the Mac. Unfortunately, the default ls color for the directory is blue, which is very hard to see. By including the line above in my ~/.bash_profile file, I changed the directory's color to cyan, which is easer to see. For more information on the syntax of the LSCOLORS shell variable: $ man ls I tested this command on Mac OS X Leopard

RTFM function
Same as the other rtfm's, but using the more correct xdg-open instead of $BROWSER. I can't find a way to open info only if the term exists, so it stays out of my version.

Find broken symlinks in the current directory and its subdirectories.
This is best run as root to avoid permission denials that can produce false positives. Obviously you can specify a directory in the usual way: $ find -L dirname -type l I can't remember where I read about this or who deserves the credit for it. The find(1) manual page hints strongly toward it, however.


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