Commands tagged internet (14)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find a file's package or list a package's contents.
This is the fastest method to search the Debian package database. Requires the dlocate package. The dlocate db updates periodically, but you may force an update with # dlocate-update

Search Google

Remove Suspend option from XFCE logoff dialog

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Trigger a command each time a file is created in a directory (inotify)
Listens for events in the directory. Each created file is displayed on stdout. Then each fileline is read by the loop and a command is run. This can be used to force permissions in a directory, as an alternative for umask. More details: http://en.positon.org/post/A-solution-to-the-umask-problem%3A-inotify-to-force-permissions

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Erase empty files
The command find search commands with size zero and erase them.

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

ROT13 whole file in vim.
gg puts the cursor at the begin g? ROT13 until the next mov G the EOF


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