Commands tagged management (3)

  • From time to time one forgets either thier gpg key or other passphrases. This can be very problematic in most cases. But luckily there's this script. Its based off of pwsafe which is a unix commandline program that manages encrypted password databases. For more info on pwsafe visit, http://nsd.dyndns.org/pwsafe/. What this script does is it will help you store all your passphrases for later on and allow you to copy it to your clipboard so you can just paste it in, all with one password. Pretty neat no? You can find future releases of this and many more scripts at The Teachings of Master Denzuko - denzuko.wordpress.com. Show Sample Output


    0
    pwsafe -qa "gpg keys"."$(finger `whoami` | grep Name | awk '{ print $4" "$5 }')"
    denzuko · 2009-05-07 14:49:56 0
  • Function: char * crypt (const char *key, const char *salt) The crypt function takes a password, key, as a string, and a salt character array which is described below, and returns a printable ASCII string which starts with another salt. It is believed that, given the output of the function, the best way to find a key that will produce that output is to guess values of key until the original value of key is found. The salt parameter does two things. Firstly, it selects which algorithm is used, the MD5-based one or the DES-based one. Secondly, it makes life harder for someone trying to guess passwords against a file containing many passwords; without a salt, an intruder can make a guess, run crypt on it once, and compare the result with all the passwords. With a salt, the intruder must run crypt once for each different salt. For the MD5-based algorithm, the salt should consist of the string $1$, followed by up to 8 characters, terminated by either another $ or the end of the string. The result of crypt will be the salt, followed by a $ if the salt didn't end with one, followed by 22 characters from the alphabet ./0-9A-Za-z, up to 34 characters total. Every character in the key is significant. For the DES-based algorithm, the salt should consist of two characters from the alphabet ./0-9A-Za-z, and the result of crypt will be those two characters followed by 11 more from the same alphabet, 13 in total. Only the first 8 characters in the key are significant. Show Sample Output


    0
    useradd -m -p $(perl -e'print crypt("pass", "mb")') user
    mariusbutuc · 2010-09-03 19:00:56 0
  • This is an easy way to quickly get a status for a device in multipath on SLES systems, as long as the server is configured based on Novell's standards, where multipathed disks are referred to by /dev/disk/by-... tree. Make sure to replace name_of_vg with your Volume Group name.


    -1
    pvscan | awk '/name_of_vg/ {print $2}' | sed 's/[-|/|]/ /g' | cut -d " " -f7
    slashdot · 2010-06-22 16:34:42 0

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Switch to a user with "nologin" shell
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While editing a source file in vim, or using vimdiff to compare two or more files, the ':TOhtml' command can be used to export each buffer as an html file, including syntax highlighting and vimdiff colorization. If you are in insert mode in vim, you will have to type :TOhtml This will open a new buffer filled with html, which you can then save.

List the size (in human readable form) of all sub folders from the current location
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check open ports without netstat or lsof

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swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Play all the music in a folder, on shuffle
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