Commands tagged search, (8)

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check open ports without netstat or lsof

list files recursively by size

rename a file to its md5sum

Create a bash script from last commands
In order to write bash-scripts, I often do the task manually to see how it works. I type ### at the start of my session. The function fetches the commands from the last occurrence of '###', excluding the function call. You could prefix this with a here-document to have a proper script-header. Delete some lines, add a few variables and a loop, and you're ready to go. This function could probably be much shorter...

Get a stream feed from a Twitter user
*** CAREFULLY READ THE NOTES **** *** THIS DOES NOT WORK "OUT OF THE BOX" *** You'll need a few minutes of CAREFUL reading before making your own Twitter feed: In 2010 simple command line Twitter feed requests all stopped working because Twitter upgraded to SSL security. Https requests for a filtered Twitter stream feed now require a special header called "oauth_header". The benefit is that your stream feed and login info is securely encrypted. The bad news is that an "oauth_header" takes some work to build. Fortunately, four functions, imaginatively named step1, step2, step3 and step4 can be used to build a customized oauth_header for you in a few minutes. Now, go look at "step1" to start creating your own oauth_header!

Convert a mp3 file to m4a
I use this to convert mp3 files to m4a files that can be used as ringtones on the iPhone. I've documented the process here: http://www.control-d.com/?p=60

find all open files by named process
lists all files that are opened by processess named $processname egrep 'w.+REG' is to filter out non file listings in lsof, awk to get the filenames, and sort | uniq to remove duplciation

Limit the transfer rate and size of data over a pipe
This example will close the pipe after transferring 100MB at a speed of 3MB per second.

Rename all files which contain the sub-string 'foo', replacing it with 'bar'
That is an alternative to command 8368. Command 8368 is EXTREMELY NOT clever. 1) Will break also for files with spaces AND new lines in them AND for an empty expansion of the glob '*' 2) For making such a simple task it uses two pipes, thus forking. 3) xargs(1) is dangerous (broken) when processing filenames that are not NUL-terminated. 4) ls shows you a representation of files. They are NOT file names (for simple names, they mostly happen to be equivalent). Do NOT try to parse it. Why? see this :http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs Recursive version: $ find . -depth -name "*foo*" -exec bash -c 'for f; do base=${f##*/}; mv -- "$f" "${f%/*}/${base//foo/bar}"; done' _ {} +

Using netcat to copy files between servers
It bypasses encryption overhead of SSH and depending on configuration can be significantly faster. It's recommended to use only in trusted networks.


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