Commands tagged validation (5)

  • Validates and pretty-prints the content fetched from the URL. Show Sample Output


    11
    curl -s "http://feeds.delicious.com/v2/json?count=5" | python -m json.tool | less -R
    keimlink · 2010-03-24 09:15:12 1
  • Place the regular expression you want to validate between the forward slashes in the eval block. Show Sample Output


    5
    perl -we 'my $regex = eval {qr/.*/}; die "$@" if $@;'
    tlacuache · 2009-10-13 21:50:47 1
  • Using the standard numeric comparison but suppressing the STDERR output acts as the simplest way to check a value is numeric. See sample output for some examples. Show Sample Output


    0
    if [ "$testnum" -eq "$testnum" 2>/dev/null ]; then echo It is numeric; fi
    jgc · 2009-10-09 14:57:27 4
  • On CentOS at least, date returns a boolean for the common date string formats, including YYYY-MM-DD. In the sample output, you can see various invalid dates returning 0 whereas a simple regex check would return 1 for the invalid dates. -d, --date=STRING display time described by STRING, not `now' The version of date on OS X does not appear to have this same option. Show Sample Output


    0
    if date -d 2006-10-10 >> /dev/null 2>&1; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi
    SteveGoossens · 2013-01-10 10:35:15 0
  • Quick and easy way of validating a date format of yyyy-mm-dd and returning a boolean, the regex can easily be upgraded to handle "in betweens" for mm dd or to validate other types of strings, ex. ip address. Boolean output could easily be piped into a condition for a more complete one-liner.


    -1
    echo 2006-10-10 | grep -c '^[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]-[0-9][0-9]-[0-9][0-9]$'
    rez0r · 2009-05-11 22:18:43 3

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

write the output of a command to /var/log/user.log... each line will contain $USER, making this easy to grep for.
This command is useful if you want to copy the output of a series of commands to a file, for example if you want to pastebin the output from 'uname -a', 'lspci -vvv' and 'lsmod' for video driver trouble-shooting on your favorite Linux forum. 'log' takes all the following arguments as a command to execute, with STDOUT sent to /var/log/user.log. The command is echoed to the log before it is executed. The advantages of using logger (as opposed to appending output from commands to a file) are 1) commands are always appended to the logs... you don't have to worry about clobbering your log file accidentally by using '>' rather than '>>' 2) logs are automatically cleaned up by logrotate. The following functions allow you to mark the start and end of a section of /var/log/user.log. $ startlog() { export LOGMARK=$(date +%Y.%m.%d_%H:%M:%S); echo "$LOGMARK.START" | logger -t $USER; } then $ endlog() { echo "$LOGMARK.END" | logger -t $USER; } printlog will print all lines between $LOGMARK.START and $LOGMARK.END, removing everything that is prepended to each line by logger. $ printlog() { sudo sed -n -e "/$LOGMARK.START/,/$LOGMARK.END/p" /var/log/user.log| sed "s/.*$USER: //"; } The following command should dump just about all the information that you could possibly want about your linux configuration into the clipboard. $ startlog; for cmd in 'uname -a' 'cat /etc/issue' 'dmesg' 'lsusb' 'lspci' 'sudo lshw' 'lsmod'; do log $cmd; done; endlog; printlog | xsel --clipboard This is ready for a trip to http://pastebin.com/, and you don't have to worry about leaving temporary files lying around cluttering up $HOME. Caveats: I'm sure that startlog, endlog, and printlog could use some cleanup and error checking... there are unchecked dependencies between printlog and endlog, as well as between endlog and startlog. It might be useful for 'log' to send stderr to logger as well.

Find the location of the currently loaded php.ini file
Quick and easy way to find out which php.ini file is being used. Especially useful if you just need to find the location of the file for editing purposes.

execute your commands hiding secret bits from history records
$ wget --user=username --password="$password" http://example.org/ Instead of hiding commands entirely from history, I prefer to use "read" to put the password into a variable, and then use that variable in the commands instead of the password. Without the "-e" and "-s" it should work in any bourne-type shell, but the -s is what makes sure the password doesn't get echoed to the screen at all. (-e makes editing work a bit better)

Convert a script to one-liner
Opposite: Convert an one-liner to script: $ foo() { ; } ... $ typeset -f foo ... $ unset -f foo

Get a range of SVN revisions from svn diff and tar gz them
Handy when you need to create a list of files to be updated when subversion is not available on the remote host. You can take this tar file, and upload and extract it where you need it. Replace M and N with the revisions specific to yours. Make sure you do this from an updated (svn up) working directory.

Create incremental snapshots of individual folders using find and tar-gzip
Creates an incremental snapshot of individual folders.

Show a script or config file without comments or blank lines

Show a listing of open mailbox files (or whatever you want to modify it to show)

Throttle download speed (at speed x )
Throttle download speed $aria2c --max-download-limit=100K file.metalink Throttle upload speed $aria2c --max-upload-limit=100K file.torrent


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