Commands tagged text (28)


  • -1
    ls -1 | xargs ruby -e'puts ARGV.shuffle'
    jacaetevha · 2014-01-17 17:42:08 2
  • Image to text converter. Convert your scanned book in image format like .png, .jpg into editable text format. OCR ==> Optical Code Reader Show Sample Output


    -3
    gocr -i ~/Screenshot.png
    totti · 2013-02-28 07:38:13 2
  • Use the following key binding to search ---------------------------------------------------------------- ng : Jump to line number n. Default is the start of the file. nG : Jump to line number n. Default is the end of the file. /pattern : Search for pattern. Regular expressions can be used. [/ = slash] Press / and then Enter to repeat the previous search pattern. Press ESC and then u to undo search highlighting. n : Go to next match (after a successful search). N : Go to previous match. mletter : Mark the current position with letter. 'letter : Return to position letter. [' = single quote] '^ or g : Go to start of file. '$ or G : Go to end of file. s : Save current content (got from another program like grep) in a file. = or Ctrl+g : File information. F : continually read information from file and follow its end. Useful for logs watching. Use Ctrl+c to exit this mode. -option : Toggle command-line option -option. h : Help.


    -4
    less file.ext
    totti · 2011-09-13 10:29:27 5
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remove all spaces from all files in current folder

Do some learning...
compgen -c finds everything in your path.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Get a qrcode for a given string

Make a thumbnail image of first page of a PDF.
convert is included in ImageMagick. Don't forget the [X] (where X is the page number). [0] is the first page of the PDF.

Find the package that installed a command

See entire packet payload using tcpdump.

Give to anyone a command to immediatly find a particular part of a man.
Example : $ LC_ALL=C man less | less +/ppattern

Convert ascii string to hex
If you're going to use od, here's how to suppress the labels at the beginning. Also, it doesn't output the \x, hence the sed command at the end. Remove it for space separated hex values instead

floating point operations in shell scripts
allows you to use floating point operations in shell scripts


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