Commands tagged browser (12)

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Tired of switching between proxy and no proxy? here's the solution.
Replace 10.0.0.0/8 with your largest local subnet. replace 10.1.1.123:3128 with your proxy information.. Note this only works with a proxy server configured for passive setup.. Now your firefox transparently proxy's stuff destined outside your network.. and Doesn't proxy stuff inside your network. as well as all your other favorite web applications. curl, wget, aria2 ect.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find where a kind of file is stored
In this case searches for where .desktop files are stored. The resulted is a sorted list of the top directories containing such files.

Extract all 7zip files in current directory taking filename spaces into account

Processes by CPU usage

rename files according to file with colums of corresponding names
Maybe simpler, but again, don't know how it will work with space in filename.

Get IP from hostname

Easily scp a file back to the host you're connecting from
Place in .bashrc and invoke like this: "mecp /path/to/file", and it will copy the specified file(s) back to the desktop of the host you're ssh'ing in from. To easily upload a file from the host you're ssh'ing in from use this: ucp (){ scp ${SSH_CLIENT%% *}:Desktop/upload/* .; }

Quickly build ulimit command from current values
It is helpful to know the current limits placed on your account, and using this shortcut is a quick way to figuring out which values to change for optimization or security. Alias is: $ alias ulimith="command ulimit -a|sed 's/^.*\([a-z]\))\(.*\)$/-\1\2/;s/^/ulimit /'|tr '\n' ' ';echo" Here's the result of this command: $ ulimit -c 0 -d unlimited -e 0 -f unlimited -i 155648 -l 32 -m unlimited -n 8192 -p 8 -q 819200 -r 0 -s 10240 -t unlimited -u unlimited -v unlimited -x unlimited $ ulimit -a core file size (blocks, -c) 0 data seg size (kbytes, -d) unlimited scheduling priority (-e) 0 file size (blocks, -f) unlimited pending signals (-i) 155648 max locked memory (kbytes, -l) 32 max memory size (kbytes, -m) unlimited open files (-n) 8192 pipe size (512 bytes, -p) 8 POSIX message queues (bytes, -q) 819200 real-time priority (-r) 0 stack size (kbytes, -s) 10240 cpu time (seconds, -t) unlimited max user processes (-u) unlimited virtual memory (kbytes, -v) unlimited file locks (-x) unlimited


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