Commands tagged performance (7)

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Convert epoch date to human readable date format in a log file.

Cleanup firefox's database.
For Mac OS X users only

Command to logout all the users in one command
This command logs out all users - which is way more secure to use ps -ef and "grep" to kill processes. Never ever use ps -ef piped to grep to kill something. If you ever need to ps-something use the UNIX95-directive, which makes sure you will never need "grep" together with "ps".

Get Hardware UUID in Mac OS X
Formats the output from `ioreg` into XML, then parses the XML with `xmllint`'s xpath feature.

Relocate a file or directory, but keep it accessible on the old location throug a simlink.
Used for moving stuff around on a fileserver

convert a line to a space

Cleanup Python bytecode files
This command will erase all bytecode versions of Python modules under the current directory.

Show drive names next to their full serial number (and disk info)
Scrap everything and use `gawk` to do all the magic, since it's like the future or something. $ gawk 'match($11, /[a-z]{3}$/) && match($9, /^ata-/) { gsub("../", ""); print $11,"\t",$9 }' Yank out only ata- lines that have a drive letter (ignore lines with partitions). Then strip ../../ and print the output. Yay awk. Be sure to see the alternatives as my initial command is listed there. This one is a revision of the original.

Check if system is 32bit or 64bit
Needed a quick way to see if my server distro that I setup years ago was running 32bit or not, since with time I had forgotten. Note: does not check _hardware_ e.g. /proc/cpuinfo but rather the kernel installed

Beep siren
Infinitely plays beeps with sinusoidally changing sound frequency. Ideal for alarm on an event.


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