Commands tagged Filesystem (33)

  • Not really alternative, just giving a different behavior listing current directory if no directory given.


    0
    cdls() { if [[ $1 != "" ]] ; then cd $1; ls; else ls; fi };
    nnsense · 2015-05-11 15:52:09 2
  • The files are automatically uncompressed when they reach the destination machine. This is a fast way to backup your server to your local computer while it's running (shutting down services is recommended). A file named "exclude.txt" is needed at /tmp/ containing the following : /dev/* /media/* /mnt/* /proc/* /sys/* /tmp/* /home/*/.local/share/Trash /home/*/.gvfs /home/*/.cache /home/*/.thumbnails /etc/fstab /lib/modules/*/volatile/.mounted /var/run/* /var/lock/* /var/tmp/* /var/cache/apt/archives/* /lost+found/* Show Sample Output


    0
    tar -cj / -X /tmp/exclude.txt | cstream -v 1 -c 3 -T 10 | ssh user@host 'tar -xj -C /backupDestination'
    fantleas · 2014-07-21 18:52:19 0
  • In this example I am returning all the files in /usr/bin that weren't put there by pacman, so that they can be moved to /usr/local/bin where they (most likely) belong. Show Sample Output


    0
    for file in /usr/bin/*; do pacman -Qo "$file" &> /dev/null || echo "$file"; done
    malathion · 2014-04-22 21:57:08 0
  • In my example, the mount point is /media/mpdr1 and the FS is /dev/sdd1 /mountpoint-path = /media/mpdr1 filesystem=/dev/sdd1 Why this command ? Well, in fact, with some external devices I used to face some issues : during data transfer from the device to the internal drive, some errors occurred and the device was unmounted and remounted again in a different folder. In such situations, the command mountpoint gave a positive result even if the FS wasn't properly mounted, that's why I added the df part. And if the device is not properly mounted, the command tries to unmount, to create the folder (if it exists already it will also work) and finally mount the FS on the given mount point. Show Sample Output


    20
    (mountpoint -q "/media/mpdr1" && df /media/mpdr1/* > /dev/null 2>&1) || ((sudo umount "/media/mpdr1" > /dev/null 2>&1 || true) && (sudo mkdir "/media/mpdr1" > /dev/null 2>&1 || true) && sudo mount "/dev/sdd1" "/media/mpdr1")
    tweet78 · 2014-04-12 11:23:21 3

  • 2
    grep -v rootfs /proc/mounts > /etc/mtab
    ohe · 2014-01-21 14:28:12 0
  • this will give u the details in MB's; from high to low.... Show Sample Output


    0
    du -xm --max-depth 2 /var/log | sort -rn | head
    srvesh · 2013-12-16 13:29:33 0
  • I added -S to du so that you don't include /foo/bar/baz.iso in /foo, and change sorts -n to -h so that it can properly sort the human readable sizes.


    1
    du -Sh | sort -h | tail
    pdxdoughnut · 2013-11-27 17:50:11 0
  • Shows the 10 biggest files/dirs


    0
    du -ah | sort -h | tail
    jedifu · 2013-11-26 12:56:58 2

  • 1
    mount -o sb=98304 /dev/sda5 /mnt/data5
    rugina · 2013-06-25 08:50:44 0
  • This is just a proof of concept: A FILE WHICH CAN AUTOMOUNT ITSELF through a SIMPLY ENCODED script. It takes advantage of the OFFSET option of mount, and uses it as a password (see that 9191? just change it to something similar, around 9k). It works fine, mounts, gets modified, updated, and can be moved by just copying it. USAGE: SEE SAMPLE OUTPUT The file is composed of three parts: a) The legible script (about 242 bytes) b) A random text fill to reach the OFFSET size (equals PASSWORD minus 242) c) The actual filesystem Logically, (a)+(b) = PASSWORD, that means OFFSET, and mount uses that option. PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS NOT AN ENCRYPTED FILESYSTEM. To improve it, it can be mounted with a better encryption script and used with encfs or cryptfs. The idea was just to test the concept... with one line :) It applies the original idea of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/7382/command-for-john-cons for encrypting the file. The embedded bash script can be grown, of course, and the offset recalculation goes fine. I have my own version with bash --init-file to startup a bashrc with a well-defined environment, aliases, variables. Show Sample Output


    6
    dd if=/dev/zero of=T bs=1024 count=10240;mkfs.ext3 -q T;E=$(echo 'read O;mount -o loop,offset=$O F /mnt;'|base64|tr -d '\n');echo "E=\$(echo $E|base64 -d);eval \$E;exit;">F;cat <(dd if=/dev/zero bs=$(echo 9191-$(stat -c%s F)|bc) count=1) <(cat T;rm T)>>F
    rodolfoap · 2013-01-31 01:38:30 5
  • In order to create a new encrypted filing system managed by cryptmount, you can use the supplied 'cryptmount-setup' program, which can be used by the superuser to interactively configure a basic setup. Alternatively, suppose that we wish to setup a new encrypted filing system, that will have a target-name of "opaque". If we have a free disk partition available, say /dev/hdb63, then we can use this directly to store the encrypted filing system. Alternatively, if we want to store the encrypted filing system within an ordinary file, we need to create space using a recipe such as: dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/opaque.fs bs=1M count=512 . cryptmount --generate-key 32 opaque . cryptmount --prepare opaque . mke2fs /dev/mapper/opaque . cryptmount --release opaque . mkdir /home/crypt . cryptmount -m opaque . cryptmount -u opaque For detail see sample output Show Sample Output


    -2
    cryptmount -m <name>
    totti · 2012-01-17 18:02:47 2
  • Clone a root partition. The reason for double-mounting the root device is to avoid any filesystem overlay issues. This is particularly important for /dev. Also, note the importance of the trailing slashes on the paths when using rsync (search the man page for "slash" for more details). rsync and bash add several subtle nuances to path handling; using trailing slashes will effectively mean "clone this directory", even when run multiple times. For example: run once to get an initial copy, and then run again in single user mode just before rebooting into the new disk. Using file globs (which miss dot-files) or leaving off the trailing slash with rsync (which will create /mnt/target/root) are traps that are easy to fall into.


    1
    mount /dev/root /mnt/root; rsync -avHX /mnt/root/ /mnt/target/
    jharr · 2011-08-24 14:29:17 0
  • Ever ask yourself "How much data would be lost if I pressed the reset button?" Scary, isn't it? Show Sample Output


    34
    grep ^Dirty /proc/meminfo
    h3xx · 2011-08-24 08:48:49 7
  • cloning root filesystem without suffering to possible interruptions. useful when moving a running system to a new partition. also works as a solid backup solution.


    0
    rsync -aHux --exclude=/proc/* --exclude=/sys/* /* /mnt/target/
    unixmonkey24812 · 2011-08-22 14:26:56 1
  • preserve all except context and xattr. useful when moving a running system to a new partition.


    -1
    cp -dpRx /* /mnt/target/
    unixmonkey24812 · 2011-08-22 14:22:01 2

  • 0
    du -h / | grep -w "[0-9]*G"
    pashutinsky · 2011-07-23 19:02:11 0
  • Necessary for fsck for example. The remount functionality follows the standard way how the mount command works with options from fstab. It means the mount command doesn't read fstab (or mtab) only when a device and dir are fully specified. After this call all old mount options are replaced and arbitrary stuff from fstab is ignored, except the loop= option which is internally generated and maintained by the mount command. It does not change device or mount point.


    1
    mount -o remount,ro /dev/foo /
    vlan7 · 2010-10-30 03:51:53 1
  • This one-liner is for cron jobs that need to provide some basic information about a filesystem and the time it takes to complete the operation. You can swap out the di command for df or du if that's your thing. The |& redirections the stderr and stdout to the mail command. How to configure the variables. TOFSCK=/path/to/mount FSCKDEV=/dev/path/device or FSCKDEV=`grep $TOFSCK /proc/mounts | cut -f1 -d" "` MAILSUB="weekly file system check $TOFSCK " Show Sample Output


    1
    ( di $TOFSCK -h ; /bin/umount $TOFSCK ; time /sbin/e2fsck -y -f -v $FSCKDEV ; /bin/mount $TOFSCK ) |& /bin/mail $MAILTO -s "$MAILSUB"
    px · 2010-10-24 00:35:23 1
  • To create directory, use: tempdir=$(/bin/mktemp -d)


    3
    tempfile=$(/bin/mktemp)
    takeshin · 2010-06-05 21:36:49 0

  • 1
    tune2fs -c -1 -i 0 /dev/VG0/data
    christian773 · 2010-05-29 08:20:35 0
  • Curious about differences between /bin, /usr/bin, and /usr/local/bin? What should be in the /sbin dir? Try this command to find out. Tested against Red Hat & OS X


    78
    man hier
    haivu · 2010-01-26 16:31:05 2
  • Iozone with a file of 2GB, 64KB record size, write/rewrite and read/re-read test, using just one thread. Show Sample Output


    0
    iozone -s 2g -r 64 -i 0 -i 1 -t 1
    w00binda · 2009-11-19 10:43:54 0
  • use the locate command to find files on the system and verify they exist (-e) then display each one in full details. Show Sample Output


    1
    locate -e somefile | xargs ls -l
    nadavkav · 2009-08-23 13:16:59 0
  • since fuse mounts do not appear in /etc/mtab (fuse can't write there, dunno if it would if it could) this is propably a better way.


    10
    column -t /proc/mounts
    unixmonkey5049 · 2009-08-09 17:00:41 2
  • Useful for analyzing disk usage. If you prefer GUI try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filelight or http://www.marzocca.net/linux/baobab/ Show Sample Output


    0
    du -aB1m|awk '$1 >= 100'
    karatatar · 2009-08-01 20:16:33 1
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