Commands tagged count (32)

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Change newline to space in a file just using echo
Changing newline to spaces using just echo

Setup a persistant SSH tunnel w/ pre-shared key authentication
This creates a persistent ssh -i /path/to/key -ND local-IP:PORT User@Server connection. You may have to install autossh. -f puts in daemon mode. if you are having trouble, try it without -f.

colorize your svn diff
Will colorize your svn diff.

Console clock
Turn your terminal into digital clock.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

append empty line after every line in file.txt

Remove blank lines from a file using grep and save output to new file
The ^$ within the quotes is a regular expression: ^=beginning of line, $=end of line, with no characters between.

Buffer in order to avoir mistakes with redirections that empty your files
A common mistake in Bash is to write command-line where there's command a reading a file and whose result is redirected to that file. It can be easily avoided because of : 1) warnings "-bash: file.txt: cannot overwrite existing file" 2) options (often "-i") that let the command directly modify the file but I like to have that small function that does the trick by waiting for the first command to end before trying to write into the file. Lots of things could probably done in a better way, if you know one...

seq (argc=2) for FreeBSD

Find installed network devices
Find installed network devices.


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