Commands tagged Videos (3)

  • Before you use this command you want to replace everything after the "https:" with the url of the video which you want to download. This string and it's switches will use "youtube-dl" to download the Youtube url into the directory/folder where it is called from. It will output the video using the same name as Youtube uses.


    0
    youtube-dl -c -o "%(title)s" -f 18 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qSCKUCjdKg
    tg0000 · 2014-06-12 23:31:55 1
  • It happened to me that I got a season of a tv-show which had all files under the same folder like /home/blah/tv_show/season1/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi But I like to have them like this: /home/blah/tv_show/season1/e{1,2,3,4,5,...}/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi So I can have both the srt and the avi on one folder without cluttering much. This command organizes everything assuming that the filename contains Exx where xx is the number of the episode. You may need to set: IFS=$'\n' if your filenames have spaces.


    -1
    season=1; for file in $(ls) ; do dir=$(echo $file | sed 's/.*S0$season\(E[0-9]\{2\}\).*/\1/'); mkdir $dir ; mv $file $dir; done
    lonecat · 2009-05-27 03:30:58 0
  • Is a simple script for video streaming a movie


    -1
    cat video.ogg | nc -l -p 4232 & wget http://users.bshellz.net/~bazza/?nombre=name -O - & sleep 10; mplayer http://users.bshellz.net/~bazza/datos/name.ogg
    el_bazza · 2010-11-29 03:34:31 1

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