Commands tagged organize (1)

  • It happened to me that I got a season of a tv-show which had all files under the same folder like /home/blah/tv_show/season1/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi But I like to have them like this: /home/blah/tv_show/season1/e{1,2,3,4,5,...}/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi So I can have both the srt and the avi on one folder without cluttering much. This command organizes everything assuming that the filename contains Exx where xx is the number of the episode. You may need to set: IFS=$'\n' if your filenames have spaces.


    -1
    season=1; for file in $(ls) ; do dir=$(echo $file | sed 's/.*S0$season\(E[0-9]\{2\}\).*/\1/'); mkdir $dir ; mv $file $dir; done
    lonecat · 2009-05-27 03:30:58 0

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