Commands tagged split (15)

  • IMPORTANT: You need Windows PowerShell to run this command - in your Windows Command Prompt, type powershell Uses sajb to start a PowerShell background job that pings an IP host every 10 seconds. Any changes in the host's Up/Down state is time-stamped and logged to a file. Date/time stamps are logged in two formats: Unix and human-readable. A while(1) loop repeats the test every 10 seconds by using the sleep command. See the Sample Output for more detail. I use this command to log Up/Down events of my Motorola SB6141 cable modem (192.168.100.1). To end the logging, close the PowerShell window or use the "exit" command. Show Sample Output


    0
    sajb {$ip="192.168.100.1";$old=0;while(1){$up=test-connection -quiet -count 1 $ip;if($up-ne$old){$s=(date -u %s).split('.')[0]+' '+(date -f s).replace('T',' ')+' '+$ip+' '+$(if($up){'Up'}else{'Down'});echo $s|out-file -a $home\ping.txt;$old=$up}sleep 10}}
    omap7777 · 2015-12-28 20:33:08 0
  • It's common to want to split up large files and the usual method is to use split(1). If you have a 10GiB file, you'll need 10GiB of free space. Then the OS has to read 10GiB and write 10GiB (usually on the same filesystem). This takes AGES. . The command uses a set of loop block devices to create fake chunks, but without making any changes to the file. This means the file splitting is nearly instantaneous. The example creates a 1GiB file, then splits it into 16 x 64MiB chunks (/dev/loop0 .. loop15). . Note: This isn't a drop-in replacement for using split. The results are block devices. tar and zip won't do what you expect when given block devices. . These commands will work: hexdump /dev/loop4 . gzip -9 < /dev/loop6 > part6.gz . cat /dev/loop10 > /media/usb/part10.bin Show Sample Output


    5
    FILE=file_name; CHUNK=$((64*1024*1024)); SIZE=$(stat -c "%s" $FILE); for ((i=0; i < $SIZE; i+=$CHUNK)); do losetup --find --show --offset=$i --sizelimit=$CHUNK $FILE; done
    flatcap · 2014-10-03 13:18:19 2
  • Output should be two JPG files named like "output-1.jpg" and "output-2.jpg". The convert command is part of ImageMagick so you'll need that and dependent packages installed to use it.


    0
    convert yourdoublewideimage.jpg -crop 50%x100% +repage output.jpg
    pagesix1536 · 2014-01-15 15:34:41 0
  • Avoiding a for loop brought this time down to less than 3 seconds on my old machine. And just to be clear, 33554432 = 8192 * 4086.


    10
    base64 /dev/urandom | head -c 33554432 | split -b 8192 -da 4 - dummy.
    pdxdoughnut · 2013-11-12 17:56:23 1
  • Is this not the same


    2
    vim -O file1 file2
    trantorvega · 2012-09-06 14:52:50 0
  • Use vim's diff mode to edit two or more files in one window. The '+diffoff!' turns off diff highlighting when the session is started. Use ctrl+w + ctrl+w to switch between windows. Show Sample Output


    2
    vim -d '+diffoff!' file1 file2
    greggster · 2012-08-30 07:51:41 0
  • Will split the std input lines into files grouped by the 5th column content.


    0
    awk -F'\t' '{print $0 >>$5.tsv}'
    pykler · 2012-05-16 18:18:16 0
  • Loops over array of a system var, splits its values and puts the values into %A, %B, %C, %D, and so on. Create array before, like set ARRAY[0]=test1,100 and set ARRAY[1]=test2,200 Be sure to replace %A, %B, etc. with %%A, %%B, etc. when using this from inside of batch files. Show Sample Output


    -2
    FOR /F "tokens=3* delims=[]=," %A IN ('SET ARRAY[') DO ( echo %A -- %B )
    Marco · 2010-08-10 12:12:27 2
  • i have a large video file, 500+ MB, so i cant upload it to flickr, so to reduce the size i split it into 2 files. the command shows the splitting for the first file, from 0-4 minutes. ss is start time and t is duration (how long you want the output file to be). credit goes to philc: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=480343 NOTE: when i made the second half of the video, i got a *lot* of lines like this: frame= 0 fps= 0 q=0.0 size= 0kB time=10000000000.00 bitrate= 0.0kbit just be patient, it is working =) Show Sample Output


    2
    ffmpeg -i 100_0029.MOV -ss 00:00:00 -t 00:04:00 100_0029_1.MOV
    nickleus · 2010-08-08 23:43:28 0
  • Open files in tabs


    -2
    vim -p file1 file2 [...]
    richard · 2010-04-15 11:40:19 0
  • -o acts like :spit. Use -O (capital o) for side-by-side like :vsplit. Use vim -d or vimdiff if you need a diff(1) comparison. To split gnu Screen instead of vim, use ^A S for horizontal, ^A | for vertical.


    7
    vim -o file1 file2...
    rkulla · 2010-04-13 22:09:47 0
  • This is just a little snippit to split a large file into smaller chunks (4mb in this example) and then send the chunks off to (e)mail for archival using mutt. I usually encrypt the file before splitting it using openssl: openssl des3 -salt -k <password> -in file.tgz -out file.tgz.des3 To restore, simply save attachments and rejoin them using: cat file.tgz.* > output_name.tgz and if encrypted, decrypt using: openssl des3 -d -salt -k <password> -in file.tgz.des3 -out file.tgz edit: (changed "g" to "e" for political correctness)


    -1
    split -b4m file.tgz file.tgz. ; for i in file.tgz.*; do SUBJ="Backup Archive"; MSG="Archive File Attached"; echo $MSG | mutt -a $i -s $SUBJ YourEmail@(E)mail.com
    tboulay · 2010-03-20 16:49:19 4
  • bs = buffer size (basically defined the size of a "unit" used by count and skip) count = the number of buffers to copy (16m * 32 = 1/2 gig) skip = (32 * 2) we are grabbing piece 3...which means 2 have already been written so skip (2 * count) i will edit this later if i can to make this all more understandable


    2
    dd if=inputfile of=split3 bs=16m count=32 skip=64
    jearsh · 2010-02-21 10:09:46 0
  • Create a tar file in multiple parts if it's to large for a single disk, your filesystem, etc. Rejoin later with `cat .tar.*|tar xf -` Show Sample Output


    17
    tar cf - <dir>|split -b<max_size>M - <name>.tar.
    dinomite · 2009-11-11 01:53:33 0
  • a - archive m5 - compression level, 0= lowest compression...1...2...3...4...5= max compression -v5M split the output file in 5 megabytes archives, change to 700 for a CD, or 4200 for a DVD R recursive for directories, do not use it for files It's better to have the output of a compression already split than use the 'split' command after compression, would consume the double amount of disk space. Found at http://www.ubuntu-unleashed.com/2008/05/howto-create-split-rar-files-in-ubuntu.html


    0
    rar a -m5 -v5M -R myarchive.rar /home/
    piovisqui · 2009-05-27 15:53:18 4

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